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Hey, I'm just wondering about everyone's way of most accurately positioning their film positive images on the screen for multicolor prints?

So tell me forum, how do u do it? ...mostly for someone like me who doesn't have micro registration :( waaahhhh

-sorry, I took that line from an equals 3 video haha.


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my employers tape a laser printed image on a shirt/product and put another board on it to see if it matches, and so on and so forth.
 

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I have a clear acetate with measurments on it...has ruler marks on the long side and short side...with a square for left chest placement and a center line for center placement..will work for front and back of shirts........I place a film in the desired location and lay a screen on it....then do that for each color until all are taped to screen.....when I first started over a year ago , I would put a shirt on the platen then lay a film on the shirt where I wanted the image to be...then I would tape it to the screen, get my square out and square the design , then take measurements as to where the image was from the top and side of the screen , and put each film at those measurments...works pretty well , but not every screen is exactly the same size so the images from screen to screen might be off a bit from each other..hope this helps

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I have a bookshelf for supplies with the side of it up against a wall. I used carpet tape to secure a platen on the top of the bookshelf with the back of the platen against the wall. There are center lines drawn in Sharpie on the platten. I put centerline marks on the films just out side the image. So you take a film and center it on the platen using the marks on the platen as a guide. Put tape on the film sticky side up, when you get a freshly coated screen all you have to do is put it up against the wall centered on the platen, lay it down and press on the tape and the film sticks to the screen. Register the platens on the press to the same distance out from the clamps, and your screens always fall in the same place. Also if you accidentally make an image bigger than your platens, you will see it when you lay the film down.:)
 

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I have a preregistration board I picked up from Ryonet. It was about $120, but well worth it. I am sure you could probably make one yourself. It basically has measurements for certain platen sizes as well as center marks and such.

I would be sure that recreating something like this would be very easy :)
 

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I have a preregistration board I picked up from Ryonet. It was about $120, but well worth it. I am sure you could probably make one yourself. It basically has measurements for certain platen sizes as well as center marks and such.

I would be sure that recreating something like this would be very easy :)
this is exactly what I did..I seen the Ryonet video were Ryan uses the registration sheet..and thought to myself "self, you need to make one of those" so I did..it isnt as fancy as the Ryonet one but works well.

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We print a paper composite of the design with center lines marked on it.

We lay the printout on the largest size shirt shirt in the job and measure for height. Then we tape the printout to the platen measured down to where the collar of the largest shirt can be pulled on to the top of the platen. This allows us the space to pull each size smaller down by a quarter of an inch, thereby moving the design up on the smaller sizes.

Take your first film and put tape on the under side, facing up and line it up with the printout taped to the platen. Put an arm down on the press and get your first screen out. Slide the screen into the arm, centered left and right on the platen and press down against the platen so it picks up the film with the tape on it. Carefully turn it over and apply additional tape as needed.

Follow with additional films and screens.

For crest designs, we have a chart to show specifically how far down the art/design is placed based on the vertical center. We also make an adjustment toward the centerline according to the width of the design. Smaller images, obviously are placed closer to the centerline on the platen. And finally, we have another chart that shows how far down to pull each size shirt.

Set ups are much easier when you've taken the time to prepare up front.

Good Luck and happy printing!
 

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We print a paper composite of the design with center lines marked on it.

We lay the printout on the largest size shirt shirt in the job and measure for height. Then we tape the printout to the platen measured down to where the collar of the largest shirt can be pulled on to the top of the platen. This allows us the space to pull each size smaller down by a quarter of an inch, thereby moving the design up on the smaller sizes.

Take your first film and put tape on the under side, facing up and line it up with the printout taped to the platen. Put an arm down on the press and get your first screen out. Slide the screen into the arm, centered left and right on the platen and press down against the platen so it picks up the film with the tape on it. Carefully turn it over and apply additional tape as needed.

Follow with additional films and screens.

For crest designs, we have a chart to show specifically how far down the art/design is placed based on the vertical center. We also make an adjustment toward the centerline according to the width of the design. Smaller images, obviously are placed closer to the centerline on the platen. And finally, we have another chart that shows how far down to pull each size shirt.

Set ups are much easier when you've taken the time to prepare up front.

Good Luck and happy printing!

aren't you worried about exposing your screen early with tis method? do you use safe lights in your printing area?
 

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aren't you worried about exposing your screen early with tis method? do you use safe lights in your printing area?
We work under yellow lights during the screen burning process and only have one screen out of the box at a time.

My brother and I built a dark box (for lack of a better term) with racks in it. It's a drying rack, enclosed so that it's totally dark inside when the door is closed. We use it to dry wet screens and store the coated screens. We pull one screen at a time to burn. While one is on the exposure unit, we set up the next one.

We also built a second box without the outer shell for drying reclaimed screens and holding exposed screens. Both are on wheels and hold approx. 28 screens each.
 

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My brother and I built a dark box (for lack of a better term) with racks in it. It's a drying rack, enclosed so that it's totally dark inside when the door is closed. We use it to dry wet screens and coated screens. We pull one screen at a time to burn. While one is on the exposure unit, we set up the next one.

We also built a second box without the outer shell for drying and exposed screens. Both are on wheels and hold 28 screens each.
I am just wondering if you have any plans for that box?
 

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I am just wondering if you have any plans for that box?

No, but I can take photos and post the dimensions. The retail place I found that had a metal/aluminum one wanted over $400 for one that wasn't enclosed and we made both for about $300 or less. The "L" brackets are what really costs.

You will need to make adjustments according to your screen size.

I'll add the specs this weekend. Here are a few photos. They were taken under yellow lights, so they're not the best quality, but you get the idea. More to come....
 

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