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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Title speaks for itself, ive ruined and burned 4 screens now. assuming its my light source that burned the emulsion on because i was using a halogen lamp. come to find out its not about watts, its about the UV exposure.
correct me if im wrong??
if anyone here has any recommendations for a good light source in a 200$ range that would be helpful.
 

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iam not expert on screenprinting, i learned it because i need to always have another option. i do DTG but i diy a box with to lighst inside 250wats each and it was good enogh, ill find some tutorials for you
 

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here some examples and turorials

ill first try finding the correct times.

pick your preferred method.
work on exposing some diferent screens, divide in parts and expose it. and find the best result
write down your times , check the exposure time and also the emulsion ammount and thikness

for getting an smooth and soft emulsion u can use petroleo, 100% works and its great. just need to start trying and testing

hope something here works


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6uWcm6lyiyM


Screen Printing Photo Emulsion Light Table


Photo-emulsion Screen Printing

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wKOlbFJpuGQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=emFCCGlzjnQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GkjZ_5EyWfg
 

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Halogen can work. Make sure there is no protective glass in the fixture, as it is designed to filter out UV. For example, people sometimes use halogen work lights and remove the glass lens from the fixture.

See the link in my sig for info on how to determine the proper exposure time. That could be most, or all, of your difficulty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Halogen can work. Make sure there is no protective glass in the fixture, as it is designed to filter out UV. For example, people sometimes use halogen work lights and remove the glass lens from the fixture.

See the link in my sig for info on how to determine the proper exposure time. That could be most, or all, of your difficulty.
I have a glass plate i put over the screens when exposing, could that be the issue?
regardless, my emulsion got burned onto my screens using halogen and im really not at the point financially to keep ruining screens so im iffy about experiments right now.
 

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I have a glass plate i put over the screens when exposing, could that be the issue?
regardless, my emulsion got burned onto my screens using halogen and im really not at the point financially to keep ruining screens so im iffy about experiments right now.
"emulsion got burned onto my screens using halogen"

By which you mean what, precisely? That is not a case of the UV being blocked or there not being enough of it.

So do you mean that your design did not wash out, that the entire screen became exposed emulsion? If so, the fault lies with your art/transparencies not being opaque enough to block UV light. How are you printing your transparencies? Laser printers suck for this. Regular transparency films from your local office supply store also suck for this.

There are professional inkjet transparency films made for screen printing available online.

As to ruining screens ... are you saying that you can't reclaim them? That the removal chemicals aren't working?

Perhaps provide some more details and we can get to the bottom of what is going wrong for you.

Enjoy :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
"emulsion got burned onto my screens using halogen"

By which you mean what, precisely? That is not a case of the UV being blocked or there not being enough of it.

So do you mean that your design did not wash out, that the entire screen became exposed emulsion? If so, the fault lies with your art/transparencies not being opaque enough to block UV light. How are you printing your transparencies? Laser printers suck for this. Regular transparency films from your local office supply store also suck for this.

There are professional inkjet transparency films made for screen printing available online.

As to ruining screens ... are you saying that you can't reclaim them? That the removal chemicals aren't working?

Perhaps provide some more details and we can get to the bottom of what is going wrong for you.

Enjoy :)
yeah no matter what i did i couldn't reclaim my screens.
i bleached them, pressure washed em, did everything i could.
i soaked them in bleach for over 24 hours.
i tried almost everything.
 

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yeah no matter what i did i couldn't reclaim my screens.
i bleached them, pressure washed em, did everything i could.
i soaked them in bleach for over 24 hours.
i tried almost everything.
But the first thing you tried was emulsion remover?

Emulsion gets locked in screens either when it is not fully exposed or is exposed to random chemicals (or both).

Take a look at posts 13 and 14 in this thread:
http://www.t-shirtforums.com/screen-printing/t75691.html#post450850
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
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