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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A big majority of the t-shirt printing companies out there are running their business with plastisol inks. You go to the mall, its common to see t shirts that are printed with plastisol correct?

Also common, people iron shirts daily. People iron shirts not knowing a shirt is printed plastisol or waterbased, etc.

Knowing such, how do manufacturers sell a plastisol product like that without worrying about customers unintentionally ruining their shirts?


Is there any method I'm missing that will indefinitely cure the shirt to the point where an Iron is not hot enough to ruin the print?

Thank you for your time.
 

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The only 2 methods i can think of for not ruining t-shirt designs, transfers, etc.. is to iron them inside out or use a teflon sheet on top of your design and start ironing with your hand iron. Hope this helps.
 

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Most printed tshirt tags state: DO NOT IRON DECORATION/IMAGE/PRINTED AREA. If they iron and ruin their shirt, it's there fault for not reading the care label.
 

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I absolutley agree with TeddyRocky, Most t-shirts do state that so yes it would be your fault for not reading the care label. But you can still iron them with the 2 methods as mentioned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
The only 2 methods i can think of for not ruining t-shirt designs, transfers, etc.. is to iron them inside out or use a teflon sheet on top of your design and start ironing with your hand iron. Hope this helps.

of course that's always a solution.. but I'm thinking in terms of the common... t shirt consumer who isnt aware of such elements...

I guess my question is... if its so common for people to iron shirts, and that its common that shirts are printed with plastisol...

why is it not a common issue known by the average consumer.... are they in fact ironing shirts, and the ink isnt smudging? You'd think that since people iron shirts that are printed plastisol, they might start to catch on or ask "why does the ink smudge?"

Most printed tshirt tags state: DO NOT IRON DECORATION/IMAGE/PRINTED AREA. If they iron and ruin their shirt, it's there fault for not reading the care label.
People wouldn't typically think to read a care label for a simple printed tee shirt,(unless it were a higher end shirt or expensive branded tee), they aren't aware of the differences between plastisol, waterbased, sublimation, etc., they take the print for granted and just wear the shirt....

I've taken old shirts out of my closet and ironed them... the only time the ink started to really smudge was when i applied extreme pressure... what gives?

does ironing really mess up a print? assuming its a professionally printed and cured print.
 

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Knowing such, how do manufacturers sell a plastisol product like that without worrying about customers unintentionally ruining their shirts?
Maybe I have too much faith in people (which is almost never the case), but I think more or less everyone knows not to iron the print on a shirt. If the customer is uncertain, they can always read the care instructions. That is what they're there for.

Is there any method I'm missing that will indefinitely cure the shirt to the point where an Iron is not hot enough to ruin the print?
With plastisol? No.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Maybe I have too much faith in people (which is almost never the case), but I think more or less everyone knows not to iron the print on a shirt. If the customer is uncertain, they can always read the care instructions. That is what they're there for.



With plastisol? No.
Like i mentioned in my second reply,I've test ironed a few shirts from my closet. I know without a doubt theyre plastisol; but in order for the print to ruin, I had to press like crazy with the pointed edges of the iron, almost scraping at the shirt. How is such durability achieved?!
 

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How do you know without a doubt they're plastisol? Being water base is really the only way they could be ironed and I believe most overseas t's are printed with water based inks.

K
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
How do you know without a doubt they're plastisol? Being water base is really the only way they could be ironed and I believe most overseas t's are printed with water based inks.

K
because a) they have a more than soft hand (u can feel the ink). B) they eventually smeared after scraping at it with an iron. C) some of the shirts were printed by a local printer who only does plastisol.
My question now is, how is that durability achieved.
 

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My question now is, how is that durability achieved.
Maybe plastisol is just more durable than you thought it was?

Personally, I rarely iron t-shirts, and I always iron inside-out when I do, just in case, so I don't even know how durable the prints are from personal experience.

Consider the fact that properly cured plastisol can hold up without cracking for 10+ years, and can handle being washed in hot water and put in a hot dryer (although this is not ideal) without major problems. As you said, you tested ironing the prints and you couldn't get them to smear until you applied extra pressure. Maybe regular, everyday ironing is just not a big deal.

I don't even consider this to be an issue. Almost all shirts are printed with plastisol. If you customers buy your shirts, they are going to expect them to be like the other dozen shirts they already have. It's not like your shirt is going to be the first shirt they have ever bought - so there will be no surprises.

Like the others said, make a note on your tag/care instructions and leave it at that.
 
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