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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been printing for a little while now, and just recently came up with a new design that is very narrow and in the center of the shirt. I have found that as I print them, the narrow image becomes very wrinkled: the shirt itself is not wrinkled but the image is all bunched up and does not look as long as it should be. Is there anything I can do to eliminate this problem? I am printing on 50/50 cotton poly shirts from Jerzees, and I have tried prewashing the shirts before printing and it helps somewhat but not as much as I would like. Thanks for any help you can provide.
 

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I have been printing for a little while now, and just recently came up with a new design that is very narrow and in the center of the shirt. I have found that as I print them, the narrow image becomes very wrinkled: the shirt itself is not wrinkled but the image is all bunched up and does not look as long as it should be. Is there anything I can do to eliminate this problem? I am printing on 50/50 cotton poly shirts from Jerzees, and I have tried prewashing the shirts before printing and it helps somewhat but not as much as I would like. Thanks for any help you can provide.
What color are the shirts and what mesh count are you using?Sounds like your ink deposit might be to heavy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am printing on purple, black, and navy with a white ink. The mesh count is 156 I believe, but I do not have them closeby right now. No pictures right now but I will work on getting them up here. If the ink deposit is too heavy, what should I do to fix that problem? Thanks again.
 

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Well,if your printing with a soft squeege try something a little harder.Hopefully you have more than one durometer squeeges available.If you increase your mesh count you might lose opacity.Some white plastisols have a slight amount of puff base in them to help with opacity.That to, could cause that wrinkle effect.What kind of white are you using?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am using a "special" Ryonet White. It has given me nothing but trouble. All the other color plastisols have not given me trouble at all, except for this stupid white. Do you have any suggestions about which type of white would be better? Also I attached pictures, the first one being what the image should look like, and the second being the "wrinkled image" shirt.
 

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Are you using spray adhesive to hold down the shirt? And, is the mesh bulging when you print from a loose screen mesh?

Just some thoughts?
 

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Your squeegee should actually be about an 80-85 degree angle facing toward you. You should also focus your pressure over and down on the print and not on pulling the squeegee against the mesh. You’ll not only have trouble passing the ink through the screen but also have very blurry images because you’re pulling the screen mesh so hard. With the proper squeegee angle, all of the ink will properly shear through the image and over your screen. In fact you should be able to run your finger over the design after its printed and barely any ink should show up on your finger.

Now let’s talk about the speed of your print. When we instruct printers to use the proper squeegee angle and pressure, the first impulse they have is to move the squeegee about the speed of a turtle. If your speed is too slow you won’t be able to properly release and clear the screen. After a print stoke, many beginners tend to sit back and look at their print, then slowly pull up on the squeegee not allowing the screen mesh to bounce back up leaving ink still stuck in the screen. After a faster stroke, you need to almost give the screen a little pop in order to get the mesh to bounce back up leave a smooth crisp print on your shirt. This is achieved by a simple flick of the wrist, the same flick you would make to insure that you pick up all the ink on your squeegee blade. Only to create this pop and release the screen, the flick must be done a little faster.

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for your help TJ, I changed from a softer rounded squeegee to a harder edged one and I'll try the wrist technique. Thanks again.
 

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Thanks for your help TJ, I changed from a softer rounded squeegee to a harder edged one and I'll try the wrist technique. Thanks again.
You should definitely be using a squeegee with a sharp, square edge. Nothing rounded...

70 durometer is recommended for textile printing.
 

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I know you said that the shirt is not wrinkled, but are you "over" stretching the shirt on the platen? 50/50 tend to be a little more stretchy that 100%. It almost looks to me like the shirt was "over" stretched on the platen and when finished printing the shirt wants to "spring back" or relax causing the ink to bunch. Have you ever had this problem with 50/50 shirts before? Just a thought...
 

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I know you said that the shirt is not wrinkled, but are you "over" stretching the shirt on the platen? 50/50 tend to be a little more stretchy that 100%. It almost looks to me like the shirt was "over" stretched on the platen and when finished printing the shirt wants to "spring back" or relax causing the ink to bunch. Have you ever had this problem with 50/50 shirts before? Just a thought...

that was my guess, that's got to be what it is. it happens to me on women's shirts with ribbed material and little kid shirts, basically anytime the palette is bigger than the shirt.

load it loosely, don't tug down or pull it tight anywhere. smooth it out w/ your hand and then let the spray tack hold it in place. try to unload it w/o stretching it too much as well.
 
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