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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all

I'm brand new here and wanted to ask.....I'm all set to purchase the Anajet for dark garments in the next day or so, I've read a fair bit about it now and I'm more or less convinced, can anyone give me good reason NOT to buy it.

Much appreciated.

d
 

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I will not tell you why you should not buy one model or another (because only you can determine if a printer will work best for your business model), but will ask you some questions to determine if you have done enough research for you to determine if you know which printer works for your business model.

1. Have you seen the Anajet printer perform everything from start to finish? Getting the printer ready in the morning, going through all the artwork steps using your graphics (both vector and raster), printing the garment, curing the garment, perform the maintenance procedures,...

2. Have you seen any other dtg printer in person and gone through all the steps from start to finish?

3. Have you created a business plan showing that getting into dtg printing is a good move for your business and will provide you the ROI in the desired timeframe?

4. Have you created a list of the pros and cons of each dtg printer that is available in your market? Not all printers are available in all the geographical markets.

5. How comfortable are you with the level of training and ongoing support you will receive from the different dtg manufacturers?

If you have not gone through all the questions in detail, then I would say you are not really ready to purchase any dtg printer. This is a significant purchase and doing some upfront due dilligence can be the difference from making good money and wasting a large amount of money. Not every business will make money with dtg printing.

Hope this helps you through your decision process.

Mark
 

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As usual Mark has provided some valuable suggestions. The question is not why shouldn't buy the anajet, but why should you buy ANY dtg printer.
Do a very simple spread sheet...the number of shirts you think you will sell a week or month. Figure your profit per shirt then figure how many shirts you must sell to recover just the initial investiment. then figure how long that will take.

From my experience in just being around this biz for about 9 years...most who buy a drg and do not have a store front, usually end up either selling it or just returning it. To incur a 20k debt is a huge hurdle for a home based business where customers cannot drop by.

So be very careful in the purchase/lease and make sure you have the funds to support the purchase for at least 6 months to a year without profit.

JMHO
 

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As usual Mark has provided some valuable suggestions. The question is not why shouldn't buy the anajet, but why should you buy ANY dtg printer.
Just to clarify something, I am not against dtg printing. In fact, I am a big proponent of it for the companies. I have several consulting clients and know hundreds of more apparel decorators that have a dtg printer, find that it is beneficial for their shop and have gotten the ROI they expected out of it. Not all of them have store fronts when they got the printer and some still don't. But it must match your business model. No one (including a sales rep) but the business owner will be able to state that buying a dtg printer is good or not good for your business without doing an indept analysis of your business. The sales reps are not going to do this study for you - it is not their job. It is the responsibility of the shop owner.

All my post above about is making sure that the original poster has done his/her's research on making sure whatever dtg printer is the right move for their business. No one should under-estimate the power of a dtg printer can bring to a shop to get several other types of jobs - where you can make additional money, but you would might not had the chance to do so without owning the dtg printer.

Best wishes in the future,

Mark
 

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All my post above about is making sure that the original poster has done his/her's research on making sure whatever dtg printer is the right move for their business. No one should under-estimate the power of a dtg printer can bring to a shop to get several other types of jobs - where you can make additional money, but you would might not had the chance to do so without owning the dtg printer.
Not to butt in......but to prove Mark's point, we had several new clients that we did prototype t-shirts for to help generate sales, one of the clients was so impressed with the shirts that during the conversation he asked what else we did....which let to a couple cases of dye-sub mugs we just delivered last week.

Yeah, maybe if we went in trying to sell mugs we would have made a order, but the DTG got us in the door.

Hope this helps.
 

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Hi all

I'm brand new here and wanted to ask.....I'm all set to purchase the Anajet for dark garments in the next day or so, I've read a fair bit about it now and I'm more or less convinced, can anyone give me good reason NOT to buy it.

Much appreciated.

d
Hi d,

I've had my Anajet for over a year now, and you should definitely pay heed to the comments below. I assume you are looking at the Anajet because you would like to be able to print on dark garments. And there in lies the rub. Any DTG printer that uses white ink is going to be maintenance intensive. And from my experience, those that experience the least amount of problems with white ink are one of two types. Either they are printing everyday and are "anal retentive" about cleaning regularly, or they print white, then flush all the white lines with cleaning fluid to avoid issues. Although it is great for doing prototypes, prototypes won't make your payments. Make sure you have a plan. Most consumers only want to pay silkscreen prices for DTG and quite frankly you'll be lucky if you can sell your shirts for twice what screening would have cost. And remember, there's no economy of scale for DTG, your printing one shirt at a time whether it's 10 or 1000. So it's hard to compete for larger orders. You need to determine if you can get the price you need at the volume you need to make a profit. Need any more info, feel free to PM me.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hi all

Thanks heaps for your input and comments, they're much appreciated. Let me tell you guys where I'm at.
I run an online t-shirt label and we are trading very well for 6 years now with our own brand and designs, due to a sharp downturn in the economy 4 screen printers have called it a day in my locality. Hence there is a market available for us to move into in corporate t-shirt printing. Most importantly short runs i.e 25-50 shirts. My thinking was a DTG and any research I have done has favored the Anajet. Currently we use poly transfers that we outsource and we also use digital transfers from our Mimaki CJV which is very good but limited in it's capabilities as it's still print and weed technology.
I hope all of this has helped you understand where we are at. The market is strong and I don't have any issued with paying off the machine it's the reliability that is my issue.

thanks
D
 

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Hi all

Thanks heaps for your input and comments, they're much appreciated. Let me tell you guys where I'm at.
I run an online t-shirt label and we are trading very well for 6 years now with our own brand and designs, due to a sharp downturn in the economy 4 screen printers have called it a day in my locality. Hence there is a market available for us to move into in corporate t-shirt printing. Most importantly short runs i.e 25-50 shirts. My thinking was a DTG and any research I have done has favored the Anajet. Currently we use poly transfers that we outsource and we also use digital transfers from our Mimaki CJV which is very good but limited in it's capabilities as it's still print and weed technology.
I hope all of this has helped you understand where we are at. The market is strong and I don't have any issued with paying off the machine it's the reliability that is my issue.

thanks
D

Others won't say good or bad but I will.

I have an Anajet FP-125 that is sitting because it is not reliable. The machine was cleaned regularly, printed with daily and I have stacks of bills to show the parts I replaced and kept on hand to make sure it always had what it needed.

With all that effort the Anajet still did not perform as needed. The worst issue was with the printer just up and stopping in the middle of a print due to the white ink coverage being too dense and triggering a mandatory head clean. Not only do you lose the shirt but you waste all the time and material to get a print maybe 2/3s of the way done.

Before shelving it, Anajet's response was "We know that is an issue, try printing less white ink." Can I tell you how well that goes over with the client who's shirt order I'm trying to print?

I'm sure there are excellent Epson/Dupont printer systems out there but I wouldn't list the Anajet as one of them.

charles95405 is absolutely correct in saying that a 20k investment gone bad is a huge setback for a home-based or small business. It just about killed us if not for our other lines of income (embroidery, vinyl, DTG with a different machine). We still struggle today trying to figure out how we get out of this hole with the lease on the machine. I have a hard time selling it in good conscience since I know it will fail; the overall design of it seems inclined to do so as I have never heard back from Anajet about a fix for "printing too much white ink".
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Others won't say good or bad but I will.

I have an Anajet FP-125 that is sitting because it is not reliable. The machine was cleaned regularly, printed with daily and I have stacks of bills to show the parts I replaced and kept on hand to make sure it always had what it needed.

With all that effort the Anajet still did not perform as needed. The worst issue was with the printer just up and stopping in the middle of a print due to the white ink coverage being too dense and triggering a mandatory head clean. Not only do you lose the shirt but you waste all the time and material to get a print maybe 2/3s of the way done.

Before shelving it, Anajet's response was "We know that is an issue, try printing less white ink." Can I tell you how well that goes over with the client who's shirt order I'm trying to print?

I'm sure there are excellent Epson/Dupont printer systems out there but I wouldn't list the Anajet as one of them.

charles95405 is absolutely correct in saying that a 20k investment gone bad is a huge setback for a home-based or small business. It just about killed us if not for our other lines of income (embroidery, vinyl, DTG with a different machine). We still struggle today trying to figure out how we get out of this hole with the lease on the machine. I have a hard time selling it in good conscience since I know it will fail; the overall design of it seems inclined to do so as I have never heard back from Anajet about a fix for "printing too much white ink".
Hey Raise

I really appreciate your honesty, it's given me real food for thought. Nice one.

Thanks
D
 

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After doing as much research as we could and then checking out the printers on our short list, we chose the Veloci-Jet. The prints are outstanding, the maintenance only takes about 10-15 minutes per day ( we are anal about it) and the customer support after the sale is even better than before putting down the money. If you have not finalized your decision and have not looked at Veloci-Jet, I suggest you do.
 

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I do agree, I recently bought a Veloci Jet and love it. I have had every thing from the original Tjet (red machine) I had 3 of them, T-Jet2's 2 of them, the T-Jet 3 and A balazer Express. I have found the Veloci Jet to be a very good machine, prints are awesome and the print speed is great. I have not used a machine yet that prints white as well as this machine does in one pass In fairness I have not used an Anajet machine but have spoke to many people that have had them and did not like them at all
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I do agree, I recently bought a Veloci Jet and love it. I have had every thing from the original Tjet (red machine) I had 3 of them, T-Jet2's 2 of them, the T-Jet 3 and A balazer Express. I have found the Veloci Jet to be a very good machine, prints are awesome and the print speed is great. I have not used a machine yet that prints white as well as this machine does in one pass In fairness I have not used an Anajet machine but have spoke to many people that have had them and did not like them at all
I guesss I should have mentioned it at the start but it's the Anajet Sprint I'm looking to purchase not the FT 125 if that makes any difference. I'd love to hear about anyone's experience with the Sprint

d
 

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I bought an Anajet Sprint and it is sittting waiting to be sold or junked. I too can show the bills for parts that failed and which Analet will not waranty, printed 32 shirts and had to replace the white ink lines, no help from Anajet. 250 shirts bad head no help from Anajet. The machine auto mait program is terrible, once printed 22 shirts had 89 cleanings, Anajet comes out with a firmware revision but wants $150, thier problem but no help. I convinced that in the 40 years I have been in business this is the biggest piece of junk I ever bought and the worst service in the history of the business. I also own a Brother GT-541 and have 70,000 prints and still going strong. I think I will go to the next SGIA show and hold a sign at the Anajet booth that says BUYER BEWARE!.
 

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It is a shame that companies do not stand behind there machines any better than they do. I have had many phone calls and folks coming to my shop and complaining about the anajet machines as well as there service and support. I actually had someone a few years back come to the shop I showed him how to run the Tjet 2 pretreat shirts the whole nine yards he spent all day at my shop printing stuff. He went back home I believe to South Alabama some where and bought an Anajet versus the t-2 3 weeks later he called complaining about there machine and support ended up suing and giving the machine back
 

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I will say Harry and the Equipment Zone stand behind there machines 100%. I got my machine 3 weeks ago and have had no problems until I broke off a machined piece on the bed that hold the shirt boards in place, Yep had my head up and broke it off. Called euipment zone and spke with Harry directly 10 minutes later I got a call from Brian Hallett and a replacement was sent out next day air. This was not an issue with the machine but my fault yet they over nighted me a replacement, if that is not service I do not know what is.
 

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Hey Raise

I really appreciate your honesty, it's given me real food for thought. Nice one.

Thanks
D

Just to give frame of reference, the Anajet FP-125 was our first DTG printer but it was not our first commercial printer. We also keep and maintain a Roland VP300. I've been in IT on both the hardware and software sides for 17 years and am perfectly capable from a technical stand point to do any type of support work on the printers.

We also picked up a Brother GT-541 and the difference even if you consider using CMYK only in the FP-125 or Sprint is huge. No more odd printing errors (like turning an image sideways and seeing it glitch out but if you rotate it back to portrait, no glitch), no more crashes due to head cleanings triggering during the print cycle and significantly less headache in getting a good nozzle check at the start of each print day.

We bought into the Anajet sales pitch and honestly, it seems like a really good idea before you start using the machine. However, I wouldn't want anyone else to purchase this company's products and lose their investment like we did.

That is of course unless you are in in my sales area in which case by all means purchase an Anajet to compete with me! J/K ;P
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Just to give frame of reference, the Anajet FP-125 was our first DTG printer but it was not our first commercial printer. We also keep and maintain a Roland VP300. I've been in IT on both the hardware and software sides for 17 years and am perfectly capable from a technical stand point to do any type of support work on the printers.

We also picked up a Brother GT-541 and the difference even if you consider using CMYK only in the FP-125 or Sprint is huge. No more odd printing errors (like turning an image sideways and seeing it glitch out but if you rotate it back to portrait, no glitch), no more crashes due to head cleanings triggering during the print cycle and significantly less headache in getting a good nozzle check at the start of each print day.

We bought into the Anajet sales pitch and honestly, it seems like a really good idea before you start using the machine. However, I wouldn't want anyone else to purchase this company's products and lose their investment like we did.

That is of course unless you are in in my sales area in which case by all means purchase an Anajet to compete with me! J/K ;P

Hey raise

Thanks for the heads up, I'm not happy to go with the Anajet, not as a direct result of your post, but that certainly helped. I also did a wash test on an Anajet Spirit produced dark garment cut in half and washed the right side. On comparing against the unwashed left side, the result after only 3 washes at 40 degrees is very worrying. Considerable fading!

D
 

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Hi Djamm,

I have worked through the introduction of early model, direct to garment printers and like many others have struggled with all of the problems including white ink settling out over the weekend, blocked nozzles & ink starvation. Yes, those machines could be kept going with regular (daily) maintenance, but even then you would still expect blocked white ink nozzles fairly regularly and ink starvation was always a potential threat in the middle of a large 'ink hungry' image.

What I can tell you is that some of the new generation machines have introduced technology that has virtually eliminated those old problems. Even our older model machines work so much better now that they have been updated with a pressurised white ink agitation system..

WHITE INK AGITATION SYSTEM
Any salesperson who tells you that "We don't use a white ink agitation system because our white ink doesn't settle" is simply not telling the truth. White ink does settle but only if it is allowed to.

Some machines now have a white ink agitation system that prevents the ink from settling in the bulk ink tanks, in the delivery tubes and in the dampers. It also pre-filters the ink even before it gets to the dampers and it delivers white ink to the print head under pressure which eliminates ink starvation. These systems run automatically and have resulted in a huge reduction in nozzle blockages and of course, increased productivity.

Now you can always pick up a white ink bottle or bulk ink bag and give it a shake to agitate the ink in the bottle, but aggressive shaking or squeezing of white ink is not good because it can produce millions of small air bubbles (which can cause ink starvation) or small particles of white pigment (that can block filters and nozzles). The other problem is that it does not agitate the white ink that has settled in the delivery tubes or dampers. That ink has to be flushed out before you can expect a bright white print. Flushing ink that has settled out increases the possibility of blocked filters and nozzles.

It's always better to prevent settling of pigment in the first place than it is to try and fix it after it has happened.


PRESSURISED DELIVERY OF C,M,Y,K
Some makes/models also now have a pressurised system for CMYK inks. This provides a much better and more reliable supply of coloured inks to the print head

ONE PASS PRINTING
Another very recent but hugely important feature is the ability to print a full colour image onto a black or coloured T shirt in just one pass. That means that both the white ink and the C.M.Y.K inks are printed during the same print pass. (A big time saver) This works very well on many photographic type images but it's fair to say that it is not suitable for all types of image.

From my experience - there is nothing more frustrating than a machine that has to be nursed along in order to keep production going. Look for the features I listed above and don't be afraid to ask your salesperson just exactly how his/her machine copes with the above mentioned issues.
 

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don't get it because, it is boggest piece of crap ever made : )
Mine broke from day 1 and kept on breaking, I lost 10's of thous. due to it.

best part was that Anajet wouldn't buy it back from me for $5thous when I just payed 16thous, and there customer service people are *****, they will "blame" the user for printer issue.

Bought a Brother 13thous prints without a hick up, best investment I made and will buy its bigger 55k brother this fall because it made me so much money so far.

I had gotten constant phone calls over the years when I had mine from other user input hpw their machine died, anajet gave zero support ect.
Surprised they aren't bankrupt yet
 
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