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Calling this DTF will just confuse people.


Not true!
DTF inks are acrylic based and create a thermoset film layer.
This is why DTF transfers can be post-pressed with out a cover-sheet. The thermoset film layer does not melt.
Sublimation inks on the other hand are thermoplastic dyes, and get absorbed by the adhesive powder.



Hmm...:unsure:.


Eh? :oops:

Ok, you can nitpick if that is all you have.

It is still using Digital Transfer Film or Direct to Film --- the films, the powder... and it works with Dye sub inks and regular inkjet inks on white shirts, and with the DTF inks obviously when you can get white to print then even the dye sub and regular inks will work on dark shirts if you have white printing also.... so no, its not confusing. What is confusing people is those who say completely false statements as if they are true.

Yes it is true, that with this process, the dye sub inks are no longer necessarily gassing in order to get into the fibers, they probably gas into the adhesive somewhat (but also just absorbed as you said), but the majority of the process is the glue is what makes the ink stick to the shirt, aka "Dye sub on cotton" as most people are referring to it, because normally you can't get the dye sub inks to gas into cotton. You can still post-press the sublimation ink with the DTF glue method, maybe you don't want to do it without a cover sheet tho, parchment paper or something.

You were mentioning a terrible example of why halftoning just doesnt work and showed a dark shirt example, so that is why I mentioned you were incorrect about that and said how it works whether you're doing halftone knockout to white shirts or colored or dark shirts -- for the regular DTF method using white inks.... the problem with the print on the dark shirt with the glow you linked to was nothing about the halftones, it was the transparency because of anti-aliased blurred edges (wrong way of halftoning) and that made white print all around and behind the pixels, it is not the glue showing up, the glue is clear and you can't see it. But the main discussion was about the attempt at white-shirt with Dye sub inks/regular inks OR dtf inks, it will generally work the same on a white shirt, but you need to do that halftoning thing.

Are you unfamiliar with shirt-color-halftone-knockout techniques? It is like built into a lot of the DTG and DTF RIPS for many many years now, and it can be done manually withing graphics programs if you know what you're doing. I also invent things and coin terms myself, but this is not one of them. This whole thing reminds me of a decade ago when I would say the words "Interlocking Halftones" and people would lose their minds. You're acting like a gatekeeper but you obviously don't even do DTF printing or know about these simple techniques to make things work. It is actually really exciting and expanding rather than limiting, now anyone with an inkjet printer and an iron can buy DTF film and powder and make excellent transfers onto WHITE (or very light grey/natural) shirts without having to buy a $500 RIP or an expensive DTF printer or convert their printer, it is just like Dye sub tho it really only works best on white shirts, but it works on more fabric materials than Dye Sub. There are also printers you can just put some DTF ink into and actually get some white ink to print as well, but that starts to get into the maintenance and conversion stuff and most regular people with just an inkjet printer at home won't really go that far with it.... but you can do a lot of stuff with this process without having to jump 100% into the extreme equipment and conversions side of it, or need to get an expensive RIP.

It is better for you to just not comment on things you don't understand, really.
 

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obviously when you can get white to print then even the dye sub and regular inks will work on dark shirts
Never tried it but I doubt it, because white pigmented substrates cannot be sublimated unless clear-coated.

You can still post-press the sublimation ink with the DTF glue method, maybe you don't want to do it without a cover sheet tho, parchment paper or something.
Maybe? Give it a try without a cover sheet then...
Works really well as foil adhesive.

Like I said, this is not a totally useless method, and there are ways to improve it
With the right type of fabric, the right design, and a bit of practice, acceptable results are possible.
The demo video I posted above comes close but still has defects.
Jaw Cartoon Font Art Snout

1. Defects caused during peeling.
These are possible to avoid with a bit of practice.

2. Not really visible in the photo, but I know from experience that these areas look and feel odd.
Using halftones will actually make the whole design worse. I've tried.
Designs without these bright highlights however will print well.
 
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