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320 degrees is low for dye sublimation. How are your wash tests?
320°F is perfectly fine when the substrate is hot-melt.

This unicorn method is problematic for 2 reasons:
a) low ink density due to gradients, means part of the design will not grab enough powder to transfer the ink.
b) Sublimation ink is not forming a film layer, so pinholes will happen.

Not a totally useless method, but very limiting.
Using JPSS transfers would be a much better option for this design.
 

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i did not know that was an option with dyesub ink and dtf (although it sounds like it is not a great idea from the results)
It's not a new method, but is tricky and has a lot of limitations.
Here is a video from 5 years ago.

probably a slightly better hand than easysubli, and better wash/dry than subli-light (no tumble dry allowed)
Regular sublimation ink is obviously OK to tumble-dry, but dyed hot-melt is not.
It depends on the melting temperature of course, but hot-melt can migrate to other garments.
This is also why low temperature sublimation inks are not used on garments (Different subject).
DTF does not have this issue, because the ink layer film is thermoset and does not melt (different subject as well).

I wonder why darks didn't work since the adhesive serves as a white underbase.
Could it be because the adhesive is actually translucent in color when melted and it seeps inside the fabric when pressed? at least that's what I noticed when printing without whites using white powder, it was transparent.
Exactly!
The adhesive is translucent put looks white in powder form. Just like sugar or salt.
The same apply to polyester by the way. The fabric looks white, but it is actually translucent.

You can buy white adhesive, but you cannot sublimate it.
You cannot sublimate white substrates. Only clear/translucent or clear-coated ones.
 

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here is that video if you are interested splathead (and a screenshot from it with the grey and blue tee's side-by-side)
If you look closely, you will notice the same defects Lauren is asking about.
Plant Petal Flower Font Art

The blue shirt came out better, but still not perfect
Azure Sleeve Font T-shirt Aqua

Possibly acceptable for printing one off distressed designs, but not good enough for retail.
 

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I've tested some prints on regular printers with regular inkjet ink and it usually works but you have to make the artwork take the white-fading areas and halftone it then knock it out of the image after revealing all of that tinting to full color so the white halftones are the only thing recreating the white fade
Only works on white shirts because the glue mess around the halftones is not be visible.
Small halftones are a problem even for regular DTF, as demonstrated here.

Like I said, not a totally useless method, but very limiting.
Works well for one off distressed designs, but if you print two copies, they will come out different.
Unlike DTF, there is no film forming ink layer to hide small imperfections in the adhesive.
 

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We are talking about DTF here, what are you referring to? "Film-forming ink layer" ?? Do you actually make DTF prints yourself or are you just commenting with what you think of how it works?
Calling this DTF will just confuse people.

The Dye Sub inks do the same as regular inkjet inks with this process.
Not true!
DTF inks are acrylic based and create a thermoset film layer.
This is why DTF transfers can be post-pressed with out a cover-sheet. The thermoset film layer does not melt.
Sublimation inks on the other hand are thermoplastic dyes, and get absorbed by the adhesive powder.

What do you mean? It is actually expanding not limiting
I didn't say anything about going on a dark shirt
Hmm...:unsure:.

and so you need to take that into account when doing the basic Dye sub or regular inkjet printing on WHITE shirts, you need to do the White-Shirt Halftone Knockout method.
Eh? :oops:
 

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obviously when you can get white to print then even the dye sub and regular inks will work on dark shirts
Never tried it but I doubt it, because white pigmented substrates cannot be sublimated unless clear-coated.

You can still post-press the sublimation ink with the DTF glue method, maybe you don't want to do it without a cover sheet tho, parchment paper or something.
Maybe? Give it a try without a cover sheet then...
Works really well as foil adhesive.

Like I said, this is not a totally useless method, and there are ways to improve it
With the right type of fabric, the right design, and a bit of practice, acceptable results are possible.
The demo video I posted above comes close but still has defects.
Jaw Cartoon Font Art Snout

1. Defects caused during peeling.
These are possible to avoid with a bit of practice.

2. Not really visible in the photo, but I know from experience that these areas look and feel odd.
Using halftones will actually make the whole design worse. I've tried.
Designs without these bright highlights however will print well.
 
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