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I just started DTF printing. I have an Epson ET-4800 with sublimation ink in it. I am using the Yamation film and powder. I also have a circuit press 12x10. I am printing the design and immediately putting the powder on it. I then pre press my shirt and immediately put the design on it. I am pressing it on 320 for 30 seconds and medium pressure. I keep getting areas where it seems to not be sticking. The first corner I peel looks amazing. Then it just goes down hill after that.
Brown Dog Dog breed Carnivore Rectangle
 

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shouldn't you have dtf ink?
did someone tell you sublimation is ok for dtf?
i don't think you can convert the 4800 to dtf, here is a list of epson's for conversion

for sublimation or dtf, you need a decent heat press

+ for sublimation you need 100% poly (white /light color tee's, the non-white will affect design colors)

you can do poly/cotton blends, but whatever the cotton content is, that is how much color density you will lose from the design (50/50 blend = 50% color gone on first wash)

or if you want cotton and dark color tee's then your best bet would be easi-subli (but it is very thick)
 

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320 degrees is low for dye sublimation. How are your wash tests?
320°F is perfectly fine when the substrate is hot-melt.

This unicorn method is problematic for 2 reasons:
a) low ink density due to gradients, means part of the design will not grab enough powder to transfer the ink.
b) Sublimation ink is not forming a film layer, so pinholes will happen.

Not a totally useless method, but very limiting.
Using JPSS transfers would be a much better option for this design.
 

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There have been recent reports of use of sublimation ink on DTF film and using DTF adhesive, can be used on white cotton. It sounds like that is what the OP is doing and perhaps what another poster on another thread may have been trying to get at, but misusing and conflating terms, IDK.

Anyway, from what I've heard the results are unreliable, perhaps there are specific techniques that can to be mastered, but so far what I've heard is that it's not a good way to go.
 

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There have been recent reports of use of sublimation ink on DTF film and using DTF adhesive, can be used on white cotton. It sounds like that is what the OP is doing and perhaps what another poster on another thread may have been trying to get at, but misusing and conflating terms, IDK.

Anyway, from what I've heard the results are unreliable, perhaps there are specific techniques that can to be mastered, but so far what I've heard is that it's not a good way to go.
thanks for that Zwik (& TABOB)
i did not know that was an option with dyesub ink and dtf (although it sounds like it is not a great idea from the results)

bear in mind too, the op's 'press' is just a large iron, and may be hard to achieve even and consistent pressure

edit to add: i just watched a lady doing this and she did 385 for 45secs, more in line with what splathead was saying
it turned out ok on a heather grey, but no go on black, and even on a medium blue the colors got lost
so this is not the unicorn we have been searching for

maybe for whites/lights it might be ok, if you can dial it in and get consistent results
probably a slightly better hand than easysubli, and better wash/dry than subli-light (no tumble dry allowed)
 

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edit to add: i just watched a lady doing this and she did 385 for 45secs, more in line with what splathead was saying
it turned out ok on a heather grey, but no go on black, and even on a medium blue the colors got lost so this is not the unicorn we have been searching for
I wonder why darks didn't work since the adhesive serves as a white underbase.

Can you post the video?
 

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i did not know that was an option with dyesub ink and dtf (although it sounds like it is not a great idea from the results)
It's not a new method, but is tricky and has a lot of limitations.
Here is a video from 5 years ago.

probably a slightly better hand than easysubli, and better wash/dry than subli-light (no tumble dry allowed)
Regular sublimation ink is obviously OK to tumble-dry, but dyed hot-melt is not.
It depends on the melting temperature of course, but hot-melt can migrate to other garments.
This is also why low temperature sublimation inks are not used on garments (Different subject).
DTF does not have this issue, because the ink layer film is thermoset and does not melt (different subject as well).

I wonder why darks didn't work since the adhesive serves as a white underbase.
Could it be because the adhesive is actually translucent in color when melted and it seeps inside the fabric when pressed? at least that's what I noticed when printing without whites using white powder, it was transparent.
Exactly!
The adhesive is translucent put looks white in powder form. Just like sugar or salt.
The same apply to polyester by the way. The fabric looks white, but it is actually translucent.

You can buy white adhesive, but you cannot sublimate it.
You cannot sublimate white substrates. Only clear/translucent or clear-coated ones.
 

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here is that video if you are interested splathead (and a screenshot from it with the grey and blue tee's side-by-side)
If you look closely, you will notice the same defects Lauren is asking about.
Plant Petal Flower Font Art

The blue shirt came out better, but still not perfect
Azure Sleeve Font T-shirt Aqua

Possibly acceptable for printing one off distressed designs, but not good enough for retail.
 

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First issue seems to be not curing the powder and going right to pressing it, not using enough heat also, and second issue is having colors that fade to anything other than solid and dense colors you will not have enough ink going down for the glue. (since you're not using white ink and only CMYK colors) I've tested some prints on regular printers with regular inkjet ink and it usually works but you have to make the artwork take the white-fading areas and halftone it then knock it out of the image after revealing all of that tinting to full color so the white halftones are the only thing recreating the white fade. This sounds complicated and if you don't know the steps to do it then there are automations like photoshop actions which can make it a simple click to prepare the art for a white-shirt DTF print. Otherwise you will get those drop-off areas where the glue doesn't stick to the fade-to-white areas / lighter colors. But this method with either CMYK or Dye sub inks and no white ink really only works best for white-shirt prints or very light colors.
 

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I've tested some prints on regular printers with regular inkjet ink and it usually works but you have to make the artwork take the white-fading areas and halftone it then knock it out of the image after revealing all of that tinting to full color so the white halftones are the only thing recreating the white fade
Only works on white shirts because the glue mess around the halftones is not be visible.
Small halftones are a problem even for regular DTF, as demonstrated here.

Like I said, not a totally useless method, but very limiting.
Works well for one off distressed designs, but if you print two copies, they will come out different.
Unlike DTF, there is no film forming ink layer to hide small imperfections in the adhesive.
 

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Only works on white shirts because the glue mess around the halftones is not be visible.
Small halftones are a problem even for regular DTF, as demonstrated here.

Like I said, not a totally useless method, but very limiting.
Works well for one off distressed designs, but if you print two copies, they will come out different.
Unlike DTF, there is no film forming ink layer to hide small imperfections in the adhesive.
"Only works on white shirts because the glue mess around the halftones is not be visible." --- No this is incorrect, it works on any shirt color, the glue is not visible around the halftones or the edges of the designs, its just like small details in a regular print.

"Small halftones are a problem even for regular DTF, as demonstrated here." --- No this is incorrect, small halftones are not a problem, but it is like screenprinting, they work good around 30 to 45 LPI, but it can be done higher and still come out good. Your example is a terrible example to use, it looked like that mess because it was done wrong, you can't have any anti-aliased edges, the halftones cut out need to be clean and high-resolution is better, just like with screenprinting you can't have fuzzy edged low-res halftones, the "mess" you see in that example is the RIP trying to put white behind all the fuzzy edges.

"Like I said, not a totally useless method, but very limiting." --- What do you mean? It is actually expanding not limiting, it lets you do all sorts of awesome stuff like not use white on white shirts, dont use black on black shirts, dont use a specific color on a colored shirt, and you can fade things into the shirt color or do all sorts of fun tricks when you get the halftones right, it just has to be done correctly that's all.

"Works well for one off distressed designs, but if you print two copies, they will come out different." --- Incorrect, where are you getting this information?? It works great for any design and it is totally repeatable.

"Unlike DTF, there is no film forming ink layer to hide small imperfections in the adhesive." --- What? This doesn't even make sense to read. "Unlike DTF" -- We are talking about DTF here, what are you referring to? "Film-forming ink layer" ?? Do you actually make DTF prints yourself or are you just commenting with what you think of how it works? The example you used was an issue with the fuzzy-edges / anti-aliased edges that will show up in any design if you have transparency pixles, it has to be either 100% solid image or totally transparent.... so we use halftones to fade into the shirt color, this is a standard part of doing DTF printing and something most printers learn to do once they have the process working well. It is no different from when people cut out solid-black from a design that has a lot of black linework in it, just like with screenprinting, and there can be lots of little details in that black (just like halftones), and as long as you have a good clean edge to the pixels the glue will hold to the ink and it won't put white that grabs the glue out into the shirt-color areas. I think you're confused about the process and how it works and the reasons it fails are not because of the halftones it is because of transparency pixels that show up if you mess up the edges and then it puts white in there. The glue is clear and not noticable on any shirt color, the example you used you are seeing lots of white ink that got put around those halftones because they were fuzzy-edges and not clean. Your comment is very misleading and basically everything you said is not true and easily disproven. It is just like screenprinting or anything else, of course it comes out bad if you're doing it wrong. I'll scan a shirt and post an example of when it is done properly how it looks.
 

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partly true, this thread is all about sublimation inks with dtf sheets and glue
so TABOB was talking about the thread topic, not dtf done with dtf inks
The Dye Sub inks do the same as regular inkjet inks with this process, I am talking about regular or dye sub or DTF inks, they don't make a difference because the ink is being transferred to the shirt with the glue, you just want your ink to remain wet on the DTF film as it usually will so the powder will stick to it. There are plenty of videos online showing how to do DTF with dye sub inks onto white shirts, the only part that most of them are missing is you gotta take your art and reveal the hues/colors and then take the white-gradient and convert to halftones, knock out the halftones from the color-revealed image and then you have no issues where there isn't enough ink going down as it fades to white-paper/shirt. You can literally do this on a regular inkjet printer and press it with an iron.
 

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"Only works on white shirts because the glue mess around the halftones is not be visible." --- No this is incorrect, it works on any shirt color, the glue is not visible around the halftones or the edges of the designs, its just like small details in a regular print.

did you see the side-by-side comparison of the blue and heather grey tee's?

dyesub ink with dtf does not work on dark tee's, it is the equivalent of jpss, ink on glue

post some examples you have done of dyesub ink with dtf papers and glue on a black tee please
 

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did you see the side-by-side comparison of the blue and heather grey tee's?

dyesub ink with dtf does not work on dark tee's, it is the equivalent of jpss, ink on glue

post some examples you have done of dyesub ink with dtf papers and glue on a black tee please
I didn't say anything about going on a dark shirt with the Dye Sub or Regular-Inkjet ink method.... talking about halftoning I was saying that is how we blend into a shirt color or create fades into shirt color with DTF and it works great and is done routinely, and so you need to take that into account when doing the basic Dye sub or regular inkjet printing on WHITE shirts, you need to do the White-Shirt Halftone Knockout method.

The original question was about a dye sub print on DTF film with the glue and pressing, and besides the glue-curing and heat-press temp issues or some pressure issues, the other main problem where lighter-colors drop off or get pulled away and don't press, is because there isn't enough ink going down there since there is no white-ink behind it, but all you do it just reveal the colors and then take the white gradient by itself and convert to halftones and then use it to chop out from the revealed-colors so wherever you have light colors/grey/fading to white you have halftones.... instead of black getting printed with small inkjet droplets and making a grey fading over the film you would have black halftone dots, etc for the colors, if you can control the calibration and make sure all colors print with full coverage then it will blend wonderfully to the white shirt and not have the transparency issues.
 

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We are talking about DTF here, what are you referring to? "Film-forming ink layer" ?? Do you actually make DTF prints yourself or are you just commenting with what you think of how it works?
Calling this DTF will just confuse people.

The Dye Sub inks do the same as regular inkjet inks with this process.
Not true!
DTF inks are acrylic based and create a thermoset film layer.
This is why DTF transfers can be post-pressed with out a cover-sheet. The thermoset film layer does not melt.
Sublimation inks on the other hand are thermoplastic dyes, and get absorbed by the adhesive powder.

What do you mean? It is actually expanding not limiting
I didn't say anything about going on a dark shirt
Hmm...:unsure:.

and so you need to take that into account when doing the basic Dye sub or regular inkjet printing on WHITE shirts, you need to do the White-Shirt Halftone Knockout method.
Eh? :oops:
 
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