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Their "normal" shirt isn't too sheer (but it's definitely a "lightweight" t-shirt).

I'd say the bamboo shirt I talked about is almost as heavy as a Hanes Beefy, but super soft.

The ringspun hanes beefy is pretty soft to begin with, but it doesn't have that "oh damn that's soft" feeling that an alternative apparel/bamboo shirt does :)

Actually, the Vapor Apparel back country t-shirt is pretty heavyweight and soft as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You know, we could commission their mill to make us somethign like that, but it woudl have to be around 1,000 pieces.
 

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Hi,
Are you saying that enzyme washes the guts out of the fabric so if you want a heavy weight soft tee you should start with a real heavy weight fabric then enzyme wash?
 

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You know, we could commission their mill to make us somethign like that, but it woudl have to be around 1,000 pieces.
I thought about that too. alterativeapparel has a custom garment process, but those minimums make me think twice every time.

http://www.alternativeapparel.com/default.aspx?id=13

I'm guessing it would be an "out of stock" fabric, which would make the larger minimums apply:

alternativeapparel.com said:
minimums and lead times:

*
In-Stock Fabric (refer to Fabrics page for in-stock fabric)

Men's style minimum: 1200 pieces per style/per color, 100 per size
Women's style minimum: 1800 pieces per style/per color, 100 per size
**We can accommodate smaller color minimums per style for some fabrics, call for
details
Sample Lead-time: 2 weeks
Bulk Lead-time (from sample approval): 6 weeks (domestic production), 8-12 weeks
(overseas production)


*
Non -stock Fabric

Minimum - 4800 pieces per style, 1200 per color, 432 per size
**Some fabrics require larger color minimums, call for details.
Sample Lead-time: 2-3 weeks
Bulk Lead-time (from sample approval): 90-120 days
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Tgraphics said:
Hi,
Are you saying that enzyme washes the guts out of the fabric so if you want a heavy weight soft tee you should start with a real heavy weight fabric then enzyme wash?
More than that - Alternative Apparel said that to me in an email:
"Well the 4001 is the 05 After we enzyme wash and die it you get the 05."
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I would think a group buy on this forum could hit 10,000 easily.
The question is, does the public care enough to cover our small increase in cost?
I really think they would.
 

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I would think a group buy on this forum could hit 10,000 easily.
All agreeing on the same idea of "quality"? Weight, sizing, fit? And then agreeing on the colors? It might be an interesting challenge :)

The question is, does the public care enough to cover our small increase in cost?
I think the end buyer doesn't mind paying for design printed on a higher quality t-shirt (again, depending on the market).

Those customers "in the know" don't mind paying more for shirts printed on AmericanApparel/Altnernative Apparel shirts that they perceive as "higher quality".

If you are in the "fashion t-shirt" market (oddica/threadless/johnny cupcakes/etc), I think you could recoup your extra costs pretty easily. With a $20-$30+ selling price, there's enough profit margin there for added garment costs.

For a shirt that is selling for $15, it may be a tighter squeeze.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Then again, plenty of folks pay $60 for Zimmerli.

Zimmerli of Switzerland -Undergarments
We are delighted to introduce the Zimmerli brand. Once you try this product, you will be hooked because it is the very finest knit undergarment produced today. Zimmerli alone uses delicate long twisted yarns that are hand loomed and fully fashioned. The trimming at the collar and armholes are made from the same material. The 100% pure cotton lisle yarn is tubular knitted, for excellent body fit, as well as durability and elastic finish. The mercerized smooth jersey is extremely refined and soft on the body. For example, the V-neck T-shirt has a one-piece collar for extra comfort. Washing is easy – 95º is fine – but dry on the line.

It is mercerized cotton, but I bet we have better process:
Mercerization is a treatment for cotton fabric and thread mostly employed to give cotton a lustrous appearance. The series of processes was devised by John Mercer in the middle of the 19th century.

Mercerized cotton, also known as pearl or pearle cotton, is cotton thread (or cotton-covered thread with a polyester core) that has been treated with sodium hydroxide (NaOH). The thread is given a caustic soda bath that is then neutralized with an acid bath. This treatment increases luster, strength, affinity to dye, resistance to mildew, and also reduces lint. Cotton with long staple fiber lengths respond best to mercerization.

[edit]
History
'In 1851, John Mercer was granted a British Patent for work he had done pertaining to cotton, linen and other vegetable fibrous materials that in effect caused certain changes in the character of the fiber when subjected to caustic soda, sulfuric acid, and/or other chemicals, etc. He went on to list a number of these changes, one of which was that caustic soda caused the fiber to swell, become round and straighten out (but it did not impart any change in luster). At the time Mercer introduced these processes, the British cotton trade showed no interest in any of it and it all sat in obscurity for about forty years. In 1890 Horace Lowe was granted a British patent in which he claimed that by applying Mercer's caustic soda process to cotton yarn or fabric under tension a resultant high luster (a result of the light reflection off the smooth, round surface) was imparted to the fiber. It became an overnight success and revolutionized the cotton industry.' [1]
 

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Then again, plenty of folks pay $60 for Zimmerli
I don't know how many people are "plenty", but I'm sure a $60 pricetag would cut out a significant number of t-shirt buyers :)

But like I said though:

Rodney said:
If you are in the "fashion t-shirt" market (oddica/threadless/johnny cupcakes/etc), I think you could recoup your extra costs pretty easily. With a $20-$30+ selling price, there's enough profit margin there for added garment costs.
 
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