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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello everyone.

Recently got my F2000, and while printing on dark garment white color is observed to be very dull.... done a couple light clean head, results are a bit better but print still dull.

I'm using following setting: Level 3, 8 passes, Uni directional, Print chart, White 30+ and Sat at 13.

I have double printed on the third line which made a bit more intense, and used (8 passes x 2 for the forth line).. using the Alstyle Tees and pretreating using Wanger sprayer.

I have attached a photo for the dull print, any input would be greatly appreciated.

Cheers.
Mike
 

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You should be doing a nozzle check after every clean to make sure you have all jets firing on all four white channels.

Level 3 white is 2 passes of 1440 x 1440 and if you increased density to +30 you should have a lot of white ink going down and probably pooling on the second pass. Upping the saturation has no effect on the white, only the CMYK.

No need to print in Uni Directional on simple text unless it's very small and fine text.

My guess is you need to increase pretreat and make sure its dry. Print in Bi Directional and use level 3 white without increasing density. You can also add a 20 sec pause between the passes.
 

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I started off trying to print alstyle tee's and came to the conclusion that they are not good for DTG, at least with the F2000. You might be able get them to work if you pretreat heat press dry, and then pretreat/press again. You might just end up with a stiff and crunchy shirt though. I would recommend trying a different tee. I'm getting great results with Canvas 3001. I get decent results with Next Level 3600 and can even get decent results with Gildan 2000.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You should be doing a nozzle check after every clean to make sure you have all jets firing on all four white channels.

Level 3 white is 2 passes of 1440 x 1440 and if you increased density to +30 you should have a lot of white ink going down and probably pooling on the second pass. Upping the saturation has no effect on the white, only the CMYK.

No need to print in Uni Directional on simple text unless it's very small and fine text.

My guess is you need to increase pretreat and make sure its dry. Print in Bi Directional and use level 3 white without increasing density. You can also add a 20 sec pause between the passes.
Thanks for the reply, Some people spray the shirt and let it dry, and some spray and press right after. There are certainly a lot of ways to do it but what's the best method to pr-treat based on your experience ?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I started off trying to print alstyle tee's and came to the conclusion that they are not good for DTG, at least with the F2000. You might be able get them to work if you pretreat heat press dry, and then pretreat/press again. You might just end up with a stiff and crunchy shirt though. I would recommend trying a different tee. I'm getting great results with Canvas 3001. I get decent results with Next Level 3600 and can even get decent results with Gildan 2000.
Thank you for your input. I'm hearing a lot of good feedback about Canavas and Gildan even Hanes but not Alstyle with F2000. Do you pre-treat with the spray wanger ? also any modifications on the setting in garment creator ?
 

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I started off pretreating by spraying by hand using an Earlax 5500 HVLP since I already had one laying around until I got enough extra money to get an automatic pretreater, but the wagners seem to to work well and are cheap. What I recommend is getting digital kitchen scale to weigh your shirt before and after you pretreat. You'll want to calculate how many grams of pretreat you are putting down per square foot and work on finding the sweet spot and work on repeating it consistently (doesn't have to be perfect or exact believe it or not)

For a Canvas 3001, which is a relatively lightweight shirt, I put down about 12 g/sqft with Image Armor Ultra diluluted 3:2 (60% pretreatment, 40% distilled water) which comes out to about 7 grams of pretreat per sqft. The reason I dilute is because at the fastest setting, my pretreater still lays down too much pretreat.

I would also recommend is using a nice brush (I use stiff Purdy Paint Brush) to brush your pretreat in a downwards direction. You'll want to brush it until you have a uniform layer of pretreat without any bristle marks showing, otherwise you may experience cracking in your print after you cure. Brushing your pretreat helps mat down the fibers from the shirt and helps even out your pretreat incase you didn't get a consistent or even spray.

You can also pretreat with a $0.99 spray bottle believe it or not. What I used to do is imagine 9 zones on the shirt and hit each zone 1 time and then brush it down. Then I would repeat one time and then cure. I was able to get pretty consistent results and I still use this technique for things like onesies except I'll imagine 4 or 2 zones instead.
 

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Thanks for the reply, Some people spray the shirt and let it dry, and some spray and press right after. There are certainly a lot of ways to do it but what's the best method to pr-treat based on your experience ?
My method sits in between those two scenarios. I have found letting some of the PT evaporate before pressing gets rid of the dreaded PT box.

I pretreat a bunch of tees at a time and hang them, after about 20 - 30 tees I begin pressing starting with the first. If I'm in a rush I will hover the element over the pretreated garment for a minute to evaporate some of the PT then press.

I have also found that if you let the pretreat air-dry fully before pressing, the vividness of the white ink is not as good in comparison. There's something about setting the pretreat with heat while the garment is still a little damp that yields the best end result.
 

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I started off pretreating by spraying by hand using an Earlax 5500 HVLP since I already had one laying around until I got enough extra money to get an automatic pretreater, but the wagners seem to to work well and are cheap. What I recommend is getting digital kitchen scale to weigh your shirt before and after you pretreat. You'll want to calculate how many grams of pretreat you are putting down per square foot and work on finding the sweet spot and work on repeating it consistently (doesn't have to be perfect or exact believe it or not)

For a Canvas 3001, which is a relatively lightweight shirt, I put down about 12 g/sqft with Image Armor Ultra diluluted 3:2 (60% pretreatment, 40% distilled water) which comes out to about 7 grams of pretreat per sqft. The reason I dilute is because at the fastest setting, my pretreater still lays down too much pretreat.

I would also recommend is using a nice brush (I use stiff Purdy Paint Brush) to brush your pretreat in a downwards direction. You'll want to brush it until you have a uniform layer of pretreat without any bristle marks showing, otherwise you may experience cracking in your print after you cure. Brushing your pretreat helps mat down the fibers from the shirt and helps even out your pretreat incase you didn't get a consistent or even spray.

You can also pretreat with a $0.99 spray bottle believe it or not. What I used to do is imagine 9 zones on the shirt and hit each zone 1 time and then brush it down. Then I would repeat one time and then cure. I was able to get pretty consistent results and I still use this technique for things like onesies except I'll imagine 4 or 2 zones instead.
C'mon Harry! Must be slipping… ;)
 
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