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My Dark shirts are not being printed correctly. They are very light in color so i decided to print test chart in GC, the test chart is also very light. See attached. I am not sure what is causing this.. My nozzle check is coming fine. All the nozzles are working.. can someone help..
 

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I did pretreat this, but it looks like the pre-treat wasn't enough. When i pre-treated it two times , then it worked fine.. but earlier i didn't have to pre-treat two times. I am using Lawson pretreater , may be the pre-treater isn't working correctly.
 

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You can adjust the spray volume on the Lawson machine to increase the amount of treatment. Even on the lowest setting it would have put more down than what was on your shirt. Make sure that you purge all the water out of the line so that actual treatment is laying down. Also make sure the tube is all the way down into the treatment container so no air is getting in. As a rule, we always treat twice with the least amount of spray (10 on the Lawson machine).


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You didn't say what kind of tee that was either. If it was a Gildan 100% Heavy Cotton or Ultra 2000 then the lightest application of pretreatment will quickly soak into the cotton and not sit on top of the material like it is supposed to do. Hence, your results. Gildans as well as other heavy cotton tees can take up to 4X as much pretreatment as a ring spun tee does.
 

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With Epson pretreatment works well. I wonder if lawson is more weak. It's very important applying pretreatment uniformly.
Sorry about my english ;)
 

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Lawson treatment comes ready to use and is not diluted. We have used Epson, Image Armor, Firebird and Lawson pre treat. Other than diluting the Epson treatment our process of applying the treatment is the same and has worked well for us. For the most part all of the treatments we have used work well. Over the years we have developed a preference for the Lawson treatment.


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You didn't say what kind of tee that was either. If it was a Gildan 100% Heavy Cotton or Ultra 2000 then the lightest application of pretreatment will quickly soak into the cotton and not sit on top of the material like it is supposed to do. Hence, your results. Gildans as well as other heavy cotton tees can take up to 4X as much pretreatment as a ring spun tee does.


As Geno points out, different brands of shirts may require different amounts of pretreat spray.

For maximum production with an automatic pretreater we are not fans of having to pretreat twice. An automatic pretreater should have the capability of being able to spray enough pretreatment to sufficiently cover in one shot. The adjustability should be in the amount of pretreat coverage depending on the shirt brand you are using - in one pass.

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With Gildans as well as other heavy cotton tees I have found that two pretreatment sessions are much better than one massively soaked heavy cotton tee. Those rules generally don’t apply to ring spun man blouses.
 

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I just bought a Epson F2000 and I am having some what the same issue it better than his problem but not good enough , I have used different pre treatments and different shirts types and a few settings
 

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With Gildans as well as other heavy cotton tees I have found that two pretreatment sessions are much better than one massively soaked heavy cotton tee. Those rules generally don’t apply to ring spun man blouses.
Using a fully burdened cost rate, I struggle with the economics of having to pretreat twice.
 

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Well then I guess you have to settle with the results that you are getting.

My thinking is that one pass of pretreatment at a setting of maybe 40 on a (first gen) SpeedTreater and then a second pass at maybe 65 or so (which isn't much at all and very cheap) is much more cost effective than trying to keep cranking up the (expensive) white ink settings.

Better pretreat management gives you better results every time. Some 100% cotton tees like more than others I have found. Every job isn't the same I don't necessarily double pre-treat every job either.

Your call. It's your equipment.

BTW - I don't sell my tees at such a low price that I don't make money on them either.
 
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