T-Shirt Forums banner
1 - 20 of 66 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I currently am new to the t-shirt thing, I just have a whole load of ideas for great t-shirts. I was wondering, which software is best to bring my ideas to life, to make what I think in my head a picture exactly how I want it. I want to be able to take pictures and use the background as a part or my design/creation or use an object in the pic as a part of my design/creation. Which software would be best??
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,051 Posts
I have both Illustrator and CorelDRAW, too, and CorelDRAW is much more intuitive, yet just as powerful.

But for photos, you want Photoshop. :)

CorelDRAW come with a raster program in its suite, but it's not near as powerful as Photoshop.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I think the one that you learn to use first will be the easiest. I have used illustrator and photoshop for years. I have tried corel but didn't like it. It took me a couple of months to figure out the tricks. But once you have it figured out it's a breese!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,051 Posts
I don't want to get into an argument over which one is better, but for me, I learned on Illustrator in school and always hated the way it worked. I downloaded the trial version of CorelDRAW, and I picked it right up. I learned the concepts on Illustrator and my 3d program, but CorelDRAW X3 was just the most intuitive program I've ever used. :)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
No, WE don't want to get into an argument over which one is better for YOU......DOWNLOAD the trial versions of BOTH, and try them. Otherwise it's going to be a long thread and you'll still be wondering what to use. If you're looking for cheap... CorelDraw Suite is the way to go.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
For the vector software, it depends on which you know the best. They basically do the same thing. I love using Illustrator, Freehand and Corel... but Corel is the most versatile.

Use vector software for anything that was drawn and written on screen (ie. by using lines and fonts) and is still in that format. This will allow you to make crisp positives for better screen printing. For anything made up of pixels like photos or scans you must use Photoshop.

So my advice is to do tutorials (which are available with the software and online) for whichever vector software you decide on and definitely do tutorials for photoshop. You will need both vector and photo software for your t shirt printing.;)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,051 Posts
No, WE don't want to get into an argument over which one is better for YOU......DOWNLOAD the trial versions of BOTH, and try them. Otherwise it's going to be a long thread and you'll still be wondering what to use. If you're looking for cheap... CorelDraw Suite is the way to go.
The part about downloading the trials is the best advice for issues like this. :)

Just make sure you set aside time to REALLY get into these programs BEFORE you open them for the first time. Once your trial starts, it starts, and for Illustrator you have 30 days to become familiar with it, and for CorelDRAW you have 15 days to become familiar with it.

I also suggest trying them out at different times. Don't try to learn both at the same time when you're dealing with the trial software. :)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
I am a pshop addict... but recently i have been using CorelX3 and it has some great features and is pretty easy to learn... Corel is also half as much to buy(around $300)

The one big plus for photoshop though is that there are a lot of websites with tutorials for photoshop...
I can give you a boatload of links... or you can google...?

all 3 programs are amazing and are only limited by how much you want to learn...
Illustrator is cool for vector and is more on the commercial artist side... photoshop can do some amazing things and there are lots of tutorials... and Corel draw is probably the easiest learning curve...easy color separations... there is a great Corel tutorial site... Welcome to AdvancedArtist.com FREE Corel DRAW training and Tutorials
 

· Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
I think ease of use all comes down to personal preference and "what you are used to". I'd wholeheartedly recommend downloading free trials of Illustrator, photoshop and Corel. Also download the full versions of Inkscape and GIMP (open source alternatives). You'll soon discover which is the best fit for you just by playing with them. I've used them all but now use Inkscape and GIMP for 95% of my work.
 
1 - 20 of 66 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top