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Discussion Starter #1
I'm curious how to get an image on a shirt short of redrawing. NOTE: I'm talking screen print not DTG where you can just hit print.

Say a local artist brings you a drawing/painting etc he did and he want's it on a shirt. How do you get it there short of recreating it there?

Scan it into photoshop?
Live tract in illustrator?

Where do you start?

Thank you for your info!

Here would be an example
 

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I would assume that picture was ment to remain a drawing. Scan it, four color process, or heat transfer. I would be extremely upset if i was the artist of that picture and someone used live trace and put it on a t-shirt. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
yeah I would be upset to, I was just thinking the other day painting and drawing I see on shirts and wondered how they came to be. I get redrawing somethings but when you want to keep a look or feel of hand drawn.

So could you still screen it or is transfer the best way? Maybe DTG would be better if they were short runs?

Thanks for helping a guy learn a thing or two.
 

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I would scan it into photoshop @ 300 dpi and I, personally, would probably do simulated-process (printing halftones using colors from the orginal scan on the press) to separate this particular image.

Happy Printing, 8J :V
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #6
when you seperate it are you talking about breaking it down into half tone CMYK? like a Cyan halftone layer and Magenta halftone layer etc?
 

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when you seperate it are you talking about breaking it down into half tone CMYK? like a Cyan halftone layer and Magenta halftone layer etc?
You can always separate using cmyk. I would check out a thread on screen printing four-color process (cmyk), it has some particularities, that are better explained by others.

simulated process is similar but instead of using cyan, magenta, yellow, and black you would use (for your particular image with the car) 2 or so shades of red, black, and grey.

From my understanding, the advantage of cmyk is that you can achieve a wide variety of color, but it can often be a little muted. Simulated process can make the bright colors a little brighter than cmyk. Both require a fair amount of control through out the process.

mdc
 
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