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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I just had a couple of questions regarding suppliers...

1)Why does it seam(to me) they don't look at heat transfers as a lucrative business. I went down to get my resale license, which was no problem, so I can sign up with some of the local suppliers. When I contacted the supplier, they asked me about the business. Since I'm new at this, I dont' have any customers or contacts. Some of them told me only if I was doing embroidery or silk screening, but not heat transfers. I don't get why. Do they think that a garage based business can't be taken serious?

2)If many people use the same suppliers, why do some suppliers make it difficult to buy from them. I was told that they don't want new business to undercut their current customers. I "think" he was talking about buying the garments from them and then taking them to a silk screener who is also their customer. What does it matter if I bought the shirts and heat pressed them, embroider them, silk screened them, or outsourced some of the work to someone else?

They wanted to know who my silk screener, seamstress, embroidery shop, etc was. I was trying to be honest about everything(since I don't have any of those connections yet), but it seams that being new was a negative in their eyes.

Just curious since I've had a hard time getting started with the supply chain.
 

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Hi. I'd be inclined not to deal with those suppliers Joseph. It really isn't any of their business how you run your own venture.

I think the thing with heat transfers is they are thought of as more of a 'hobby' print method. Most office supplies sell heat transfers, Avery brand in particular. Even though it's a chore, most are advertised as just needing an ordinary domestic iron to apply. It's that association.

I buy from wholesalers at wholesale prices by buying in quantity. Virtually all my supplies are bought online, with no personal contact with the wholesaler. How, why, where I run my business is none of their concern. They take my money and I get the goods I ordered. Perfect commerce.
 

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I am careful how I word what I do. Here is a typical description I use:

I "embellish" casual horse show theme apparel with custom designs. I sell online, vend at local events and supply local clubs with custom branded merchandise.

Using that type of wording has worked very well for me. you could replace "horse show" with whatever your theme is you plan to sell, Parody, fishing, car racing, etc. I don't say they are "my" custom designs (though in this case they are).

It does raise my hackles when I am asked these detailed questions. I JUST got a very long list of questions sent to me by a vendor recommended here and I bit my tongue as I filled out the answers. If they didn't sell what I want to buy, I would go elsewhere.

Good luck!
 

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If its an upscale supplier it might be in the companys best interest not to devalue the brand. They are probably associating low end printing with flea market vendors etc. They may also not want mass produced image type apparel directly competing with a more fashion styled non decorating customer.

They might see the clothes as clothes and not billboards.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys....The 2 suppliers I called were local to me and that's why I called them first. 1 of them went ahead and set me up about 15 minutes ago, so I was able to get on that account. I decided not to "beg" the other company since it was more like an interrogation instead of a business relationship.

I just contacted one more supplier that I found on the web and they had no issues at all...no Tax ID, no license, nothing. I found them on the Gildan distributor list, so I'm assuming they are ligit. Everything went smooth and I had no issues get them setup as a supplier.
 
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