T-Shirt Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
we have a very small, very poorly ventilated area to print in. we have a 4 color screen press that, at this moment, no one knows how to use. so on top of teaching ourselves how to use it, can anyone recommend what types of inks are safe for us to use in a small space, as well as where is a good place to order them from?
we are planning on printing local artists work on various colored t-shirts, both light and dark.

thank you!
becky
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
we have read that plastisol is not ok if you do not have a well ventilated area. also, my boss at work screen prints and he told me that plastisol would not be ok because it would make the whole strip we are in smell bad, and we have a food establishment next door. we have read that you need respirators to use plastisol, and that extended exposure in small, poorly ventilated areas can possibly cause some severe medical issues. are there different types of plastisol?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thank you for your input! i also called the company that we got our supplies from and they gave me the same advice, plus the msds sheets. we just want to make sure that everyone has a healthy experience with this.:p
 

· Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Plastisol is odorless. And the chemicals used to clean it are citrus smelling.
It's ordorless until cured.

Your best non-toxic choice is waterbased inks. They can air dry and won't produce the odor and "smoke" that plastisol does when cured. Keep in mind you still need to cure waterbased ink in a conveyor dryer, heat press, or even household dryer (if applicable) so the ink doesn't washout.

Waterbased inks can present their own challenges that you should look into before using them, such as drying quickly in your screen.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
870 Posts
Plastisol is odorless before and after curing. If it smokes your doing something wrong. Get the ink to 320 degrees and it's cured, no smoke, or smell.

Waterbase might actually be a bad idea for you, as it is much more difficult to cure without the proper dryer. Do you have a decent conveyor?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
I agree, plastisol is easier to work with especially if you're just starting out, but considering your original post stating your concern for health and safety via proper ventilation, waterbased would be the way to go if that is a major concern. Go ahead and try both plastisol and waterbased in a poorly ventilated work space, over the course of your print run you will notice the difference in air quality, however slight. An odor is an odor no matter how slight or noticeable. The msds is no joke if you are actually health and safety conscious. As for smoke, yes, if you see it you need to make adjustments.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top