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Hi there,

I'm looking for information on how much to charge for a t.shirt. I want to make sure i am not charging to much or too little. I have sold 3/4 printed t.shirts already and i have just started out and would like to find my feet more on the pricing structure. The t.shirts i printed sold between £7.99 and £9.99, 2 was for text and small image on front and the other was for text on the front. These were done on white t.shirts.

I would also like to know what i should charge for wholesale, do i keep the same price per t.shirt?:confused:

Thank you in advance:)
 

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I'm no expert in the t-shirt business, it's just a small part of my business. But here are a few general ideas.

There are two elements of value in a printed T-Shirt. One is the intrinsic value of the shirt, represented by the quality of the blanks used, the quality of the printing, and the utility of the shirt as a garment. This is usually the smallest part of the value, although still very important elements. This is the only element where your cost of goods is relevant in determining the selling price.

The second and often more valuable element of value is the value of the design which is extrinisic and largely subjective to the buyer. A very clever or attractive design by a talented designer can add huge value to the shirt. Sometimes hundreds of dollars for limited edition T-Shirts by famous artists, but this is rare. It is the design that separates the Lucky Brand from cheaper shirts. That's why they cost $40-$70 bucks. That's also why only certain buyers are willing to pay that much. For some, the designs are not worth the premium or they are not appealing. Again, this element of value is subjective.

Exploiting these elements of value depends on finding the right buyers. Ed Hardy and Lucky find them by wholesaling to Nordstroms. For the rest of us, it is a lot more difficult. You need the right outlet and marketing to reach the right buyers for your product.

As for wholesale vs. retail price and markups, it largely depends on where you fall on the value scale. The more extrinsic value, the more mark-up over cost of goods you can demand. For shirts with small extrinsic value, you have to settle for less mark-up and make your money in volume.

I hope this is helpful.
 

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base your pricing on your competitors pricing.
theres two types of pricing to consider

penetration pricing
coming in cheaper than the competition to steal market share.

price skimming
have a really high price (still realistic) and then drop your price for a sale and sell lots. This is what most T-shirt brands do......
 
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