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For prints that cover the entire shirt, some are actually printed onto pieces of fabric that are then cut and sewn into a shirt. Others are printed onto shirts using an all-over print technique. Screen printing with water base and discharge inks is probably going to be the best method, especially if you want retail quality.
 

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Today I went to a couple screen printing shops in town and when I touched their display shirts the ink/print was very ... I dont even know how to describe it. It was coarse and felt almost like a heat transfer. How do you get the "worn in and faded" look. Does that change with different bases for the screen printing?
 

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That shirt looks like an all over print using discharge inks. If you notice, the design fades out toward the edge around the shoulder and sides which leads me to believe it was printed on a constructed shirt, using all over platens and a rotary press. Belt prints leave an impression of the front collar when printing the back of the shirt, which this does not have. Very nice, advanced print.
 

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The samples you felt were probably standard plastisol inks. Some brands are better quality than others, but for the most part, they will have a rubbery feel. A softhand additive can be used to give plastisols a softer feel. But water based inks will provide the softest feel possible. Most retail brands like Ed Hardy, Affliction, etc all use water based inks.
 
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