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Well, as you can see by my signature line, that I am using the
Heat Master 15" x 15". I chose this model for a few reasons. It was getting great initial feedback, it is very well constructed, it looks pretty good, and it was all digital. Also, I bought it as part of a group purchase over at signs101.com so we qualified for distributer pricing. We were able to purchase 12 of these for less than half the current price.


Now, I'm getting the Hix HT-600-Digital 16" x 20" from the same company that I bought the Heat Master from. They have so far shown me excellent customer service.

There seems to have been some bugs that needed to be worked out on the Heat Masters. Many of the initial units that were sold had problems reaching or maintaining the proper temperature. The first unit I received seemed to have this problem, even though I didn't realize it at first. The company promptly sent me another one and paid shipping in both directions. A+ service. The second unit doesn't seem to have any issues, although I could no longer recommend to my friends here at t-shirtforums a Heat Master at this time.

I'm choosing the Hix HT-600-D not because of the price, as it is certainly not the least expensive model or brand. I'm choosing it because of it's reputation, it's large size, digital temp and time settings, and tilting lower platen.
 

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i'm very very very new to this... i just bought a hix ht400D because i read many good reviews about it. well, about hix. the ht400D is digital, has a floating bottom, adjustable timer (audible) and i could afford it - would've gone for the 600 if i had more money, but i only print shirts, so i realy don't need a bigger one.
 

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I am using a Hix 116 x 20 digital press. Purchased it because of its solid reviews and it's large size. I can also gang up on mousepads and smaller items. Just able to do more in less time.
 

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digicopy said:
I am using a Hix 116 x 20 digital press. Purchased it because of its solid reviews and it's large size. I can also gang up on mousepads and smaller items. Just able to do more in less time.
This is a very good example of a reason to get a larger press. You can gang up many things this way.
 

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I bought the Hix Hobby lite. I do dog t-shirts so the small size does not affect me. Since we are just starting out, my wife (she is smarter than me) suggested we go with the hobby lite and if for some reason we get so much buisness we need to up grade, that would be a good thing. I have not had any problems with it although I did some adult shirts and it takes aome getting used to. For what we have used it for, it has done the job.

Jason
Bark N Style
 

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Grayhead said:
I bought the Hix Hobby lite. I do dog t-shirts so the small size does not affect me. Since we are just starting out, my wife (she is smarter than me) suggested we go with the hobby lite and if for some reason we get so much buisness we need to up grade, that would be a good thing. I have not had any problems with it although I did some adult shirts and it takes aome getting used to. For what we have used it for, it has done the job.

Jason
Bark N Style
How cute! (doggies) What is it you need to get used to? What was the problem with doing larger shirts? I am debating between this and the Presto as my next press. I only plan on doing 8 1/2 x 11 sheets, but I am confused by the size: 9 x 12 ? Does it pose a problem only if you are using larger sheets or when using adult, does the size of the material get in the way of the machine? Not sure how it exactly works! :)

--Newbie Doby
 

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In order to center the design you have to roll one side of the shirt because of the arm of the swing away. I tried folding the shirt but the transfer's ended up uneven. I only did 4 shirts for a paying customer.(other than shirts for family) Each shirt had 3 locations, the back center, the left chest and the arm. They all ended up working out fine. I also put an old shirt against the arm because grease from the swing has ruined one or two shirts. After the first few shirts I have not had any problems.
Jason
 

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Grayhead said:
In order to center the design you have to roll one side of the shirt because of the arm of the swing away. I tried folding the shirt but the transfer's ended up uneven. I only did 4 shirts for a paying customer.(other than shirts for family) Each shirt had 3 locations, the back center, the left chest and the arm. They all ended up working out fine. I also put an old shirt against the arm because grease from the swing has ruined one or two shirts. After the first few shirts I have not had any problems.
Jason
* sigh * I was also looking at the Presto...sorry to veer from the topic...
 

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badalou said:
Anyone use the mighty press 15 x 15? I just bought one and I am waiting for shipment.
Now you've got me interested in the Mighty Press...

The Lite 11 x 15 seems within my budget (almost). Why did you choose Mighty Press? Is there a difference between the 11 x 15 & the 15 x 15? Where did you get it? Since I know you do totes, it will work on them? Mighty Press vs. HIX? Pros cons? Thoughts?

--Newbie Doby
 

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The difference is the size for one. I truly believe as others will tell you, if your going to do tees then you need a larger press. When I started with Totes Amore I was just doing bags on Ebay. I did a lot before Christmas. Then my friend who reps product back east saw the product I was doing and now he is showing my totes. He will not show my tees as he thinks that market at the gift shows is over saturated.. Me, I think if you got something, show it.
 

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Some advantages of the Mighty Press are the over the center pressure adjustment as opposed to most clamshell models which have them in the back. Also the upper floating platen, which levels off before clamping on your design. They are definitely work horses. Some of my customers have been using them for 10+ years.
 

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I think Im going to hold off and spend the extra $300 on a Phoenix Phire 20x16. After the last couple weeks of comparing the numbers, its the best press for my money. Quick question for John. The plug Ill be using is on a 20 amp breaker. Should I have this upped or will it be enough amperage?
 

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JoshEllsworth said:
Some advantages of the Mighty Press are the over the center pressure adjustment as opposed to most clamshell models which have them in the back. Also the upper floating platen, which levels off before clamping on your design. They are definitely work horses. Some of my customers have been using them for 10+ years.
I was wondering what the floating platen was for, as it is the only one in this price range I saw that had one. I'm leaning to the 11 x 15 more and more.
 

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Lou, I have had a mighty press for about a yr. an a hat press from the same company. We like then very much the mighty press is a 15x20.
Rich
 

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hammered said:
I think Im going to hold off and spend the extra $300 on a Phoenix Phire 20x16. After the last couple weeks of comparing the numbers, its the best press for my money. Quick question for John. The plug Ill be using is on a 20 amp breaker. Should I have this upped or will it be enough amperage?
That will be plenty of amperage. The 16 x 20 model pulls 14.5 amps.
 
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