T-Shirt Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I know that these are newbie questions and i hope that everyone here can help me out. But the questions are the ones listed as the title.

thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
584 Posts
On-Contact is when you have the screen touching the substrate (the t-shirt). Off-Contact is when you leave space between the screen and the substrate. You ALWAYS want to use Off-Contact.

Flooding the screen is pushing the ink with the squeegee through the screen before doing an actual print. It gets the ink lined up in the screen for you to print, and can keep your ink from drying in the screen if you are using waterbased ink. Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
On-Contact is when you have the screen touching the substrate (the t-shirt). Off-Contact is when you leave space between the screen and the substrate. You ALWAYS want to use Off-Contact.

Flooding the screen is pushing the ink with the squeegee through the screen before doing an actual print. It gets the ink lined up in the screen for you to print, and can keep your ink from drying in the screen if you are using waterbased ink. Hope this helps.
Why do you ALWAYS want to use off contact, and at what spacing do you use for this method?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
584 Posts
all you need is about 1/16"-1/8" for a shirt I believe. The reason is that you won't have the screen snapping off the t-shirt when you print. The screen will deflect when you print on it. If you use proper off-contract with high tensioned screens, then the ink will lay down uniformly onto the top of the garment. This means that you are not driving ink into the garment, causing the color of the garment to show through the inks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
i guess im am still a bit confused about flooding the screen to me it would seem like if you push ink into the screen before you print you will smear or smudge the ink when you apply it to the shirt..... any help?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
584 Posts
From my experience (and I'm no professional), you don't have this type of problem. I use plastisol ink, which is PVC based. Though you want it to be creamy, when you flood the screen, it stays. You don't want to drive the ink through the screen, but rather just lay the ink on top of the emulsion.

If you were to lay ink on your screen and start printing, you'd probaly get spots of the shirt that don't have a good amount of ink layed down. When you give an initial flood stroke, you are sort of prepping the screen with ink. Since you have off-contract, there is never ink touching the shirt, and it doesn't drip through the screen or anything like that (I guess unless you were using a very low mesh like 60 or somethin).

I did a quick google search and found this link that provides a little more information:

Screen Printing Squeegees: How To Pull Prints
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top