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Discussion Starter #1
OK, I don't claim to know everything there is about screenprinting (one of the reasons why I joined the forum! :)) but I do know a thing or two about spot colors. Here's what I want to ask you all:

What do you do when a client gives you a design that they INSIST is 4 color process when you know for certain it will look better with (for example) 6-7 spot colors. Do you do what you know is best, or do you do what your customer asks for?

In other words, I'm interested in how you might handle the customer that thinks they know more than you do...
 

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At the end of the day the customer has the final say because they sign the checks.

You as a trades person, it is your responsibility to inform the customer of all possibilities relating to the job, process, quality, finished look and cost, plus a guarantee etc.

you have the option NOT to approve the job for production if you feel this will Deface your work/name and turn out to be a future problem.

In our case we take on very few new customers now (usually when the art/concept has potential and the boss likes the person behind it), we are not money greedy 100% so less "know it alls" come our way, our regulars trust our ability to achieve what they need and this keeps us busy and makes our job more enjoyable.

You need to make it clear to your customer what you believe is the best way to do the job according to their needs. Always.


 

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I agree. They were probably told somewhere that it could be done as a 4-clr process. More than likely from someone in OffSet. Good luck and if they persist just print 4-clr process.
We charge $250 for four color process set up (seps). this usually gets them thinking of something a little more feasable.
Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I agree with everything you say, Lucy. I try to have samples to show, try to tell them that we know what we are doing and they can trust us, etc. Sometimes I wish I did have the option to say NO.

I find myself in a unique position here in this community. Unlike the forum members I've met here, my company does t-shirts as promotional items, so our clients are looking to get it for the cheapest price possible. If we can't do it, our competitors will.

I'm always interested in how others handle these things in the event I'm missing something, though. Thanks for your feedback.
 

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AddVenture said:
I agree with everything you say, Lucy. I try to have samples to show, try to tell them that we know what we are doing and they can trust us, etc. Sometimes I wish I did have the option to say NO.

I find myself in a unique position here in this community. Unlike the forum members I've met here, my company does t-shirts as promotional items, so our clients are looking to get it for the cheapest price possible. If we can't do it, our competitors will.

I'm always interested in how others handle these things in the event I'm missing something, though. Thanks for your feedback.
i know what you mean. But remember that the lowest price is the law type client is NOT loyal, they will go to the competitor and jump around a lot. Thats why one needs to keep the good customers, give them that little extra everytime. Loyal Customers that know you are there for them dont mind paying a little extra too.

In the promotional client sector you are dealing with re-sellers really. Like you said the price points there do matter. But then again, if its the Brand that tells the promo-comp. to use you, that will make a difference. :D

Do try to take all jobs if you can to fill 40 hrs/week ....... the norm. :)
 

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I find myself in a unique position here in this community. Unlike the forum members I've met here, my company does t-shirts as promotional items, so our clients are looking to get it for the cheapest price possible. If we can't do it, our competitors will.
I don't think you're the only printer here who prints promotional t-shirts.

In the situation you outlined above, usually the art deparment will show the customer (via graphic mockups) how the graphic will look as a 4 color process and how it would like as a spot color design and give them their professional opinion on which would work best for their design. In the end, as Lucy says, it's the customer that has to decide and pay for the end product. All you can do is educate them as much as possible, when possible.

Usually, on those type of jobs, I wouldn't get in a "bidding war" with another printer (which sometimes turns out to be a "phantom" printer). If the price they are getting from another printer is that much lower than yours, then you tell the customer they are getting a great deal and feel free to contact you if it doesn't work out.

You might not be able to win all the customers, but I would just focus on rocking the ones you do have so they tell their friends and send repeat business.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Rodney said:
I don't think you're the only printer here who prints promotional t-shirts.
I hope that I'm not! It's a brutal biz, though, let me tell you :(.

And, as always, thanks for your feedback, Rodney. I always appreciate your comments.
 

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Kenn
we offer custom printing and embroidery yet 75% of it is contract work for many clients locally and across the country. Our prices are not the most expensive yet are far from the cheapest. You need to find a comfortable margin of profit and stick to it. If they go downt he street to save .05 they get what they deserve. I have 5 competitors within a mile fo each other on the same street. Three of us have Autos. I dont price war. If they weant the best they pay and get the best thay can and quality from start to finnish.
Yes its a brutal business but "you can do it" :)
 
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