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Discussion Starter #1
I ran into this situation last night. I was printing WB opaque white on a blue shirt. I was useing a 110 screen with a print, clear, flash, print, clear technique. I had 1 shirt that the bottom of the print had a 1/8" or more of ink on it( it was way off the shirt). I had already flashed the shirt and it was the final print stroke. I went a head and cured it that way. What are you supposed to do in that situation?
 

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there is nothing you can do.. I wouldn't give that to the client either. IT does happen from time to time when you are putting even pressure on your entire print stroke. When you flood after you printed a light stroke you will have extra ink in certain areas that will build up on the next print stroke.

Keep the shirt for later Scrap/Test prints and make sure to make enough to fulfill the order.
As far as I know there isn't anything you can do about it.
 

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If that "mountain range" effect isn't something you are trying to do on purpose then I can suggest some problem areas.

First make sure there is adequate pallet adhesive on the pallet so the shirt won't lift up while you print.

Secondly you probably aren't clearing the ink through the mesh with your stroke technique so adjust your stroke pressure and angle and verify that you clear the ink from the screen. If you don't clear the screen, then as you lift the screen from the shirt it will cause that effect.

Thirdly try a higher mesh count like a 160-180 so you don't lay down as much ink but then you have to push harder with the squeegie to clear the image area of ink.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I had it a about 1/8 at first but adjusted to a little more. At 1/8 the center of the print was sticking to the screen. Its a long print 17.5" what your seeing is the very bottom. after i made the adjustment it seemed to work better, but i had to push harder on the squeegee.
I had a lot of problems with the tack adhesive in the center of the platen too. Id keep putting it down and it keep transferring to the shirt.
 

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what type of adhesive are you using?? are you using the spray adhesive or are you using a waterbased adhesive(looks like elmers glue)

If you are having problems with the spray adhesive transferring to the shirt you need to let your platen cool down more before applying it. Are you curing on your platen???
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I am using CCI top bond mist. No, I am just flashing on the platen, but they where 40 sec flashes. the 10-15sec flashes did not do it.
 

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Print with higher mesh. Sounds like your mesh might not have been tight enough.
Also sounds like your platen is a little warped.
Place a straight edge on it to see if it's warped.
 

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higher mesh doesn't always mean a tighter screen, but it usually does.

40second flashes are a long time.. that's longer than it takes me to cure most ink colors.
That could be why your adhesive wasn't staying on the platen.
A waterbased adhesive might work out better for you if you are flashing that long. Waterbased adhesives usually come in bottles and look like elmers glue. You can apply them with scoop cards, goop scoops, sponge brushes, or even mix it with water and put it in a spray bottle. You flash the platen after you apply it to get it activated and sticky. The more heat you apply to it afterwards the better it seems to work. I always use this type of adhesive for any job requiring a flash because of how long it lasts.

Celtic: i never thought about a warped pallet. I don't' think any of mine are, but I'm going to check now. Hopefully the OP doesn't have any warped pallets. that would be a bummer.
 

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looks like a tester shirt.
i'd go with a 160mesh, print flash print dryer.
you may have a warped platten too.
way too long of a flash, your flash must be pretty far from the shirt.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
higher mesh doesn't always mean a tighter screen, but it usually does.

40second flashes are a long time.. that's longer than it takes me to cure most ink colors.
That could be why your adhesive wasn't staying on the platen.
A waterbased adhesive might work out better for you if you are flashing that long. Waterbased adhesives usually come in bottles and look like elmers glue. You can apply them with scoop cards, goop scoops, sponge brushes, or even mix it with water and put it in a spray bottle. You flash the platen after you apply it to get it activated and sticky. The more heat you apply to it afterwards the better it seems to work. I always use this type of adhesive for any job requiring a flash because of how long it lasts.

Celtic: i never thought about a warped pallet. I don't' think any of mine are, but I'm going to check now. Hopefully the OP doesn't have any warped pallets. that would be a bummer.
I don't remember exactly how high i had the dryer but I think it was 2-4 inches off the platen.
I have some of the water based glue. I will try it ad see it it works better. Thanks for the tip.
 

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From what I see it looks like you didn't finish your stroke completely past the design or, the screen didn't make at least some contact with the shirt. I get the best results with my off contact just a little less than 1/8 inch but I never use loose screens. I also had a similar problem when I found out the my platten was not parallel to my screen. The very edge of the platten closest to the press was actually rounded down just enough to cause me to have to push harder at the very end of my stroke. (replaced the plattened fixed it) Also something you can do if you ever lift your screen and see to much ink on the shirt while still wet. Lower your screen back down and run a dry stroke with your squeegee and pick up the access. Also 40 seconds is along time at 2-4 inches. Your asking to warp your platten, also your adhesive will just stay wet at that temp. I usually flash 12 seconds. Keep in mind that after a few shirts and your platten heats up you can shorten your flash time slightly because the platten is retaining heat.
 

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If you have a heat press, you could flatten the print a little. 330 degrees for 8 or 10 second. Just make sure to have a teflon sheet or craft paper or something covering the print. And then peel really slowly. And if that doesn't work, just go shoot somebody in the face(mask) with a .68 caliber (paintball). Always makes me feel better.:D
 

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Discussion Starter #16
If you have a heat press, you could flatten the print a little. 330 degrees for 8 or 10 second. Just make sure to have a teflon sheet or craft paper or something covering the print. And then peel really slowly. And if that doesn't work, just go shoot somebody in the face(mask) with a .68 caliber (paintball). Always makes me feel better.:D
It makes me feel better too!:)
 
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