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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
thank you,could you please help with with this im a little confused
1. if i was using a faded tiff, for example like the mr retro fades

(tutoril im following here-
Mister Retro - Machine Wash Image Filters )

in photoshop then taking in it in to illustrator what benefit would a tiff have over using a jpeg bitmpap in live trace pixel for pixel as there is only black and white pixels, there isnt really any loss to have in defintion and the tiff file size is larger?
2.whats the benefits of having 600dpi fades when ive read a few times on here that to burn to a screen its pointless having anything over 300 dpi as the screen/ink when printed wont pick it up?
3. finally whats the benefit of linking the file and not embedding it? isnt this just more complex and fiddley , thanks a lot
 

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LZW is what I use for Tiff's. Image quality is better with tiffs over jpegs even at the same dpi, I think so that is. I'm not sure if it really matters for use with the live trace tool. Illustrator makes much larger files when incorperaiting tiffs. I would run a quick test using a LZW tiff and a jpeg. Check file size/handleing and quality. Just an idea...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Fred,
if i have a tshirt i want to work on in vectors then import to photoshop for some bitmapping worn/texture effects over the top, is this the correct way to go about it?
Create in ai the vectors , take the ai file in to photoshop to experiment with fading and texturising the diffent vector elements. Then save the layers of texturing as individual bitmapped tiffs. then reopen the bitmap tiffs individually with original ai artwork in illustrator and place accordingly in layers over the top. Do I then save the layered tiffs and ai file as an ai file?? thanks a lot ,Andy
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
sorry forgot to add this at the end. are the psd photoshop files bette to use than tiffs? can the same methodology be used with them as well?why would you use a tiff ahead of a psd as they can both be layered?
 

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PSDs can include vektordata, tiffs can not. Using PSD (plus copy and paste) is the only way you can move vektor between PS and AI. PSDs are proprietary Adobe, and only Adobe can use the vektor data from PSDs

Some ways layers in tiff are used are not standard. But this should not be a big problem (don't ask me details about this).
 

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I always recomend linking your bitmap .tifs. It makes any changes to the placed .tifs in illustrator a breeze (you can just re-link the changed .tif instead of re-doing the whole graphic). Obviously, this only makes sense if you are combining multiple bitmaps in an .ai file.
-Just remember to send the linked .tiffs along with the .ai layout if you send this to another printer!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
can i open a tiff file of my transparent fading in illustrator and then copy and paste it over my a.i. image vector artwork that needs fading, then save it as a.i? i dont see the point in linking the artwork that needs fading to the tiff? im still confused over this point. if its not linked and instead pasted over the top does this mean it wont show up properly in the rip as good as it would if it was its own sperate tiff file being linked? thanks
 

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No, there is no gradient object you can copy, only pixels with a gradient.
You can copy selections from single layers or from all layers, but only pixels.
From the moment you made the gradient, Photoshop knows nothing (except in the undo/redo buffer for some time) about how the pixels came there.
 

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PSDs can include vektordata, tiffs can not. Using PSD (plus copy and paste) is the only way you can move vektor between PS and AI. PSDs are proprietary Adobe, and only Adobe can use the vektor data from PSDs

Some ways layers in tiff are used are not standard. But this should not be a big problem (don't ask me details about this).
The problem will happen when someone opens a layered tiff in some program other than Photoshop and that program ignores all the layer data and doesn't bother to warn the user. In my opinion, layered tiffs should be avoided unless every photo editing application could understand Photoshop's layers and also the layer masks etc.
 

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i think tiff compression has higher resolution than jpeg but it is a large file. some photo editing application vb.net can understand layers and create tiff layered images. we also need to pay special attention to the program.
Hi, classpass.
I am not using PHOTOSHOP, either. I think most of its products are too expensive, especially for the students. I will try your sharing later.



Best regards,
Peter
 

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I always recomend linking your bitmap .tifs. It makes any changes to the placed .tifs in illustrator a breeze (you can just re-link the changed .tif instead of re-doing the whole graphic). Obviously, this only makes sense if you are combining multiple bitmaps in an .ai file.
-Just remember to send the linked .tiffs along with the .ai layout if you send this to another printer!
Do you really trust everyone to save the linked tiffs & not ignore the error message they get if the tiff is missing?

I ask because a couple of years ago I tried it this way & a garment was printed without any of the distressing that would have only shown up with the tiff...
But that was when working with someone in China who notoriously didn't pay attention to details. Ever since, I've always embedded a tiff over vector artwork, but I kind of hate the huge files, especially when I'm using the exact same tiff file in 16+ designs that all need to be emailed & put into work at the same time.

Since I'm not the one sending the files to the printer these days, I don't trust my boss to remember to send the tiff along with the pdf Illustrator artwork anyway, but do you think the average printer would speak up if it was missing, or just continue without it?
 

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Just keep in mind that when a tiff is placed into illustrator that it is just "linked", by default. Linking an image (tiff in this case) into an .ai document serves the purpose of keeping the file size down and the document more manageable. When you're ready to send the final version to the printer you only need to embed the linked image (tiff) thus removing the secondary step of emailing the separate tiff document to accompany the .ai file.
 

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If I have to email 42 different designs to the same person in China, all using the same tiff, I just thought it could possibly help us both out if the file was linked instead of embedded in each file, but I guess not.
Well that would be an obvious advantage to linking when you're talking multiple files using the same tiff. But if you're boss won't budge, you're up a creek.
 
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