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Discussion Starter #1
I typically accept credit cards in person or over the phone, so I get a personal authorization to use the card, but I have a new customer out of state that has sent his billing address and credit card info via email on a large order. Our email correspondence history outlines the quote details, and contains his email with the card information - is this enough authorization to charge the card that he supplied, or do I need to get additional information from him? I just want to make sure I'm not charging a fraudulent card that will get charged back or wind me in some sort of trouble with it.
 

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Is this the first time you have done business with this customer? Call in unexpected or a referral?

Talk to your credit card processor.

Be sure.

The rules are different if the card is not swiped. The rules for that differ depending upon your agreement with your processor.

Looks like a duck, smells like a duck----it could be a duck.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It does smell fishy but I've never seen a scammer actually send me a card number so I thought it MIGHT be legitimate. It's not a referral, just an out-of-the-blue customer. Then again alot of my new customers come from random places (google, advertisements, etc.) so I'm not sure on this one. Good idea to call my credit card processor, I'll give that a try tomorrow and see what they say.
 

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I worked for a small electronics retailer many years ago.

I saw a $10,000 sale come in from a neighboring community and the owner's son write it up and tell me not to worry about it.

It was approved using the credit card number and was not swiped.

The card was stolen.

Because it was not swiped (meaning the card was not present) the bank took the money back out of our account.

THANKFULLY-I had the mind to imprint the card manually when the thief came to pick up the merchandise.

That is the only way we got the money back.

Talk to the bank to be sure.

Not worth worrying about. If it slows down the deal slightly and the customer is on the up and up he will not only understand but will appreciate it.


But, that is just how I would do it.
 

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At the end of February, I had someone place an order online for almost $1,300. After I printed out all his information, his bill to and ship to did not match. I do get that from time to time, but normally it's in the same general area. This time, the card was in Wisconsin and ship to was in Miami. I found the card holder (Google has it's pros) and they said they had just reported the card stolen.

I thought about contacting Miami Police and setting up a mini sting. ;) I was going to send a package with a tracking number. I found the shipping location was a UPS store and figured when he picked it up, the police could nab him. Unfortunately, I didn't follow through. My thought was, the card was already reported stolen and the police (sad to say) have bigger things to contend with.

A week later, the guy who made the purchase called me. So he says he placed an order in my store and wanted to know where the product was since he hadn't seen it yet. The guy actually called from the number he placed in the information on my site. I told him I could not send the product out because the card he used was reported stolen. He acted surprised and said he would look into it and get back to me after he finds out what happened.

Never heard from him again.....
 
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