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What are the best technique to screenprint a solid white on dark Tees?
I am new to screen printing and have heard white ink is a pain. Is water base white ink ok to use on dark tee shirts.

thanks for any tips!
 

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The only water based white that I know of that won't be a pain to print on a black shirt is Gen IV ink. Is your shirt going to be 100% cotton? I like the discharge look and soft feel. You can get a white discharge that would work on a 100% cotton shirt.
 

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This is the $64,000 question. the answer depends on the look and feel your looking for.
 

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I would use an opaque white plastisol if you can cure, flood pulling towards you and print pushing away from you. If your locked int water-based, permaset white has never let me down.
 

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In printing plastisol, white on dark colors, print/flash/print, a trick I picked up recently is to overflash a little bit. Not enough to begin curing the ink, just to go beyond the "tacky to the touch" feel. The second coat will may down much smoother and coat better. God Bless.
 

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I've had little success with the push stroke. Maybe too much pressure or bad angle. For plastisol I've had the best results with a print - flash - print using either Wilflex xtreme white or International Coatings white. I prefer the Wilflex because it has a more consistent body. I never do a flood stroke really. I've tried it but didn't see the difference. I'm going to start experimenting with discharge or plasticharge underbase for a less bulletproof print.
 

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The elusive bright white on black with no flash. It can be done, but unless you just want to beat your brains out, what I've found that works well with a 156 mesh, as opposed to a 110 or 86 is, like in the video of Bill Hood, do a hard flood to fill the stencil, then push the ink in front of the squeegie just like Hood does. Then a dry print stroke to mat down the fibers. Flash, then again, fill the stencil and follow with a print stroke, but just hard enough to clear the stencil. It won't take much since the second print stroke seems to really stick to the first.
Yields a nice smooth, really bright print, and not too heavy handed.
 
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