T-Shirt Forums banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
first of all i have a small clothing company, and i'm interesting in printing shirts with water based inks to get a more thinner soaked in the shirt effect.
(as you know that kind of look is really all the rage these days)
so may i ask if someone could explain the difference between water based vs.regular plasticol ink?
also would wated based inks be able to print 4 color designs as well as plasticol ink?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,700 Posts
Hi there, I remember someone asking about this before and I found this thread in a forum search for water based:

http://www.t-shirtforums.com/showthread.php?t=2371&highlight=water+based

It has some good points about both types of screen printing.

There was a post with a link to a really helpful PDF file that explained the two printing methods, but I can't seem to find it now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
So from what I've read in other posts a DTG would be waterbased, and it looks like it may solve some of the water-based difficulty issues.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,700 Posts
So from what I've read in other posts a DTG would be waterbased,
Direct to garment printing isn't screen printing. It is basically printing using an inkjet printer (like an epson 2200) directly onto the garment. That's different than using water based screen printing inks pressed through a screen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
That would be one of the issues, The screens tend to clog with water based inks. If you get the soft hand result whats the difference if you DTG, or screen except that it sounds like with DTG you would be better equiped to print for a small clothing co.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,700 Posts
If you get the soft hand result whats the difference if you DTG, or screen except that it sounds like with DTG you would be better equiped to print for a small clothing co
The image quality on dark garments would be a big difference. I saw a few DTG printers at the printwear tradeshow and you just can't get decent results with those printers, yet. From what I was told, there should be significant improvents within a year.

But to keep this thread on topic :), water based inks are for screen printing. Maybe another member knows more about the merits and challenges of the two different processes?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
I'm not trying to wander on the topic, Could it be These light hand shirts (waterbased) inks "seem" to be all the rage these days because of DTG.
I mean the market is saturated with them. Just 2 years ago I hardly saw any.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,700 Posts
Could it be These light hand shirts (waterbased) inks "seem" to be all the rage these days because of DTG.
I don't think so. Since DTG isn't really used that often. It's relatively new and not very widespread (especially on dark garments).

Water based inks and other types of screen printing (discharge printing, etc) are the types of screen printing that give a really soft hand. That's usually what's being used on the high end shirts people find in retail stores.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Your probably right. It just seems strange to me that with the advent of Dye Sub and DTG, That this soft hand has become popular. I agree, if you want to do dark shirts I would'nt even consider it as an option.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,512 Posts
StitchShoppe said:
It just seems strange to me that with the advent of Dye Sub and DTG, That this soft hand has become popular.
I think they've probably always been popular, but the technology (and awareness of the technology) is improving, so it's easier to produce those kind of shirts now. We tend to focus on the big flashy improvements of new technologies (it's definitely more attention grabbing), but the old technologies are being improved as well.

As for dye sub and DTG... they're tiny insignificant specs in the fashion world. They're huge in promotional wear (which is a huge industry), but you won't walk into, say, Hot Topic or Walmart (let alone a fashion boutique) and see shirts printed with those methods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
Solmu said:
I think they've probably always been popular, but the technology (and awareness of the technology) is improving, so it's easier to produce those kind of shirts now. We tend to focus on the big flashy improvements of new technologies (it's definitely more attention grabbing), but the old technologies are being improved as well.

As for dye sub and DTG... they're tiny insignificant specs in the fashion world. They're huge in promotional wear (which is a huge industry), but you won't walk into, say, Hot Topic or Walmart (let alone a fashion boutique) and see shirts printed with those methods.
I agree with Lewis. Most all of the shirts I see out there in retail are still plastisol ink. I guess if you have a high end fashion line it would be more appropriate to use waterbased inks or DTG. Personally, I can't wait until DTG gets really nice and is affordable, I just started screen printing myself and I'm already tired of the little hassles haha.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
What's huge right now are companies like Ed Hardy and Troy Kingdom using TJet machines to produce any kind of art they like on any kind of shirt color. I'm not certain if those inks are water based, but they're nearly invisible to the hand.

I recently posted a topic re: my experience with a water based ink on screen, and it wasn't a happy experience. In hot conditions (it's been pretty hot here in L.A.), they air dry on the screen and within the mesh, causing the prints to deteriorate with each application.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,512 Posts
dennymclain said:
In hot conditions (it's been pretty hot here in L.A.), they air dry on the screen and within the mesh, causing the prints to deteriorate with each application.
It doesn't need to be hot: it's currently winter in Melbourne, and if I don't print fast enough the ink still dries in the screen (and fairly quickly at that). Some brands of inks are better than others in that regard.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,512 Posts
hongkongdmz said:
Would water-baed ink be a better choice for printing then plastisol? Anyone, have any preferences?
Whether it's better or worse very much depends on your needs, as it has drawbacks and benefits. There's probably enough information on the forum to decide which would work best for your requirements.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
backseat kiss said:
first of all i have a small clothing company, and i'm interesting in printing shirts with water based inks to get a more thinner soaked in the shirt effect.
(as you know that kind of look is really all the rage these days)
so may i ask if someone could explain the difference between water based vs.regular plasticol ink?
also would wated based inks be able to print 4 color designs as well as plasticol ink?
i am a merchandising/fashion major, and my suggestion to you in regards to this look being popular now is to try and find something new. because most likely, by the time you figure designs out, get your garments, print, and sell it to stores, it's not going to be "hot" anymore.

i know not everyone is interested in being a design or even technique pioneer, that's ok, but it's so important to look what's past fashionable now. trend forecasters in fashion are already predicting 3-5 years from now, retailers look -at the very minimum- 4 seasons ahead of the current season. being cutting edge or avant garde isn't for everyone, but staying just a bit ahead of the trend curve should be, i think.

with growing consumer access to magazines, the internet, today's customer is so much smarter and more aware, they demand new ideas faster. on one hand, it makes our job very hard, but on the other, it's a great challenge to find new inspiration everywhere.

if you'd like to jump into a little bit of forecasting, just start reading magazines and note what you're seeing- color, silhouettes, textiles, etc. All of those can be translated into t-shirt design for sure. i highly recommend picking up Women's Wear Daily (WWD)- most major cities have it and it's really sweet.

if you have any questions about forecast related jazz, i'll totally help you out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
505 Posts
I've read this particular thread about a dozen times and I'm still not clear on one thing - does the DTG use water based inks or not?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Hey Rodney:

Here is the PDF of the doc above http://www.pneac.org/sheets/screen/Plastisolvwaterbase.pdf

Rodney said:
Hi there, I remember someone asking about this before and I found this thread in a forum search for water based:

http://www.t-shirtforums.com/showthread.php?t=2371&highlight=water+based

It has some good points about both types of screen printing.

There was a post with a link to a really helpful PDF file that explained the two printing methods, but I can't seem to find it now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
Hey Whats Up! THANKS FOR THE T-SHIRT RODNEY! I thought I'd drop by to see how everyone was doing. With using the TJET i had them print me some samples and they send it over the white t-shirt was a no-hand/soft hand touch and the black t-shirt was thick hand like plastisol because they needed to print a white underbased so the color would pop out more. DTG or TJET does use waterbased inks but it's their own mixture seperate from the Waterbased Ink you purchase from companies like Rutland's K3 System. My experience with Waterbased ink is that it's the best. For my clothing being more of a high-end line, and what I wanted the feel to be I went with Waterbased Inks. It was the right choice, its alittle bit more pricey than printing with plastisol but if you're producing a high-end line then you have to go all the way. And with Waterbased Inks and Discharge you can print wet on wet but will tend to clog your screen. But from my experience you can dilute your waterbased inks 5-10% with more H20... I love waterbased prints, producing no-hand and soft-hand prints are what I personally thrive for. Just keeping checking out this site because it has a ton more information! Just remember t-shirts will never go out of fashion...
Let me know if you have anymore questions....

Annushka said:
I've read this particular thread about a dozen times and I'm still not clear on one thing - does the DTG use water based inks or not?

Thanks
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top