T-Shirt Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have recently started working at a local screen printing shop. Like every other screen printing shop in my state, this place only does plastisol inks. In order to give us an advantage over the competition, I am in the process of adding water-based inks to the repertoire of the shop. There is one hurdle in the shop though that I don't know how to overcome, and that is the dryer. It is an Odyssey Mercury dryer, not sure of the model number, but I really think it is the same thing as the current Workhorse Mercury dryer, I suppose Workhorse bought them out. On the dryer there is an adjustment for belt speed, but not dryer temp. From my understanding, to properly cure water-based ink, you need to keep it in the dryer for about 3 minutes. Without being able to adjust the dryer temp, slowing the belt to that speed would cause my shirts to scorch. Is there any possible way to properly cure water-based inks with this dryer? What if I send the shirts through two or three times?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,022 Posts
Try blowing a fan down the tunnel. Maybe that'll keep the temps down just enough to avoid scorching. The added airflow will help with the drying too. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
i'd go back plastisol, this water base thing is a hoax. (hey phillip, how was that for heading them off at the pass) stan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
557 Posts
Don't know where you get 3 minutes from! I would speak to the intended supplier of the waterbased ink (if you have already purchased it then it is probably printed on the side)

First question is what temperature does the dryer achieve? (What settings are they using for the plastisol??)

My Waterbased inks (well the ones I use, not mine) are cured 150 (celcius) for 20 sec (1 minute for best results) So as long as you can set the speed to achieve that there isn't an issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I'm using Matsui water-based inks and I really love the way they have come out so far. Only problem is, the first batch I printed did not properly cure and washed out. I'm doing a wash test right this minute on another print I did today. I doubt I'll have any fading issues, but I did just slightly scorch the shirt, so I believe what I'm going to do is speed up the dryer and just run my shirts through twice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
903 Posts
DRYING/CURING: Matsui ink must be cured for 2.5 to 3 minutes at 300 to 320 degrees F under typical infrared heat.
Curing Options: Water based inks cure differently from standard plastisol inks. While plastisol inks cure with infrared once reaching 320 degrees, water based inks cure best with air movement and heat. Air movement is preferred to drive water out of the ink and blow away steam so heat can cure water base pigment properly. Without hot air movement across the ink, water based inks will take much longer to cure. In good air flow, water based inks can cure in under 1 minute while it may take 2.5 to 3 minutes in a standard infrared dryer. (Paper can be allowed to air dry)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
557 Posts
In addition to Tj's comments, times for drying can be reduced considerably if the waterbased ink is allowed to air dry first (Obviously this depends on your your needs as to the practicality of it and also depends a bit on where you are climate wise!)
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top