T-Shirt Forums banner

Do you recommend a washout booth and filtration system for beginners?

  • Yes, both!

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Only a filtration system

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Neither

    Votes: 0 0.0%
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

Registered
Joined
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi there!

I'm new to the forum and screen printing. I taught myself the basics way back in 2015 and, this year, I decided to give it a real go. I've made a wooden board with hinges for my screens and bought ink, emulsion, and emulsion stripper among other supplies.

Now that I'm ready to start printing, I'm worried about the chemicals I'm using going down the drain.

My inks are water-based and my stripper is made by Sgreen, but I worry about clogging the drain and generally making a poor environmental choice. Above all else, I want my small business to be environmentally friendly. 馃挌

What is the best way to get rid of screen printing waste? Whether that's ink, emulsion or emulsion stripper, I want to do away with it properly. I've begun to research washout booths and filtration tanks, but are these necessary for beginners? I have two screens, and I expect to change my designs maybe 2-3 times a week.

Any advice you can give would be much appreciated!
 

Registered
Joined
2,431 Posts
You can remove ink waste from the equation by scraping it from the screen and using a non emulsifyable 'on press' cleaner such as Easisolve 842. Wipe off with a rag - the rag can be cured and is no longer hazardous. Takes a few seconds longer than washing the ink down the drain.

There are plenty of filter units - at a price. You can make one with a small pump and some cannister filters.
When the water is 'clean' you have the choice of putting it down the drain or recirulating it ( using it again).
If you are going to re-use it then you will need to add a neutralizing agent in the water to adjust the pH.

Proper screen exposure is the best way of minimising waste water. An under exposed screen will use a lot of water to rinse out. A properly exposed screen will only need about half a bucket of water to rinse.
Same goes for removing emultion. Let the stencil stripper soak in for a few minutes and the emulsion will come straight off.
 

Registered
Joined
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You can remove ink waste from the equation by scraping it from the screen and using a non emulsifyable 'on press' cleaner such as Easisolve 842. Wipe off with a rag - the rag can be cured and is no longer hazardous. Takes a few seconds longer than washing the ink down the drain.

There are plenty of filter units - at a price. You can make one with a small pump and some cannister filters.
When the water is 'clean' you have the choice of putting it down the drain or recirulating it ( using it again).
If you are going to re-use it then you will need to add a neutralizing agent in the water to adjust the pH.

Proper screen exposure is the best way of minimising waste water. An under exposed screen will use a lot of water to rinse out. A properly exposed screen will only need about half a bucket of water to rinse.
Same goes for removing emultion. Let the stencil stripper soak in for a few minutes and the emulsion will come straight off.
Good point about limiting ink waste and proper screen exposure! Are all screen cleaners not non-emulsifiable?
 

Registered
Joined
2,431 Posts
No, most regular/cheaper ink removers tend to be emulsifyable, which means they turn the ink into a slimey goop that washes off easier. Non emulsifyable cleaners are designed for 'on press' ink changes and opening blocked screens. The ink is removed by a rag and the residue evaporates. A little more expensive, but reduces ink down the drain to next to nothing.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top