T-Shirt Forums banner
1 - 20 of 33 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a GX-24 and am having some weeding issues.

I cut a sign with lots of words on it, each letter about .75 to 1" tall, so not super small, but small enough.

When I try to weed off large strips at a time, it picks up some of the letters that have been cut.... almost as if it is not fully cutting through the vinyl. I have to do a lot of tweezer work to ensure the letters don't get picked up.

I've adjusted my force settings to around 120 to ensure that its cutting through entirely. My blade isn't that old and my cutting strip isn't in bad shape.

Is this something everyone deals with, or could this be an issue with my force or blade?

I want to be able to do what this lady does in this video:
[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JtHlYc5JB2M[/media]

If I were to try what she does in the first 10 seconds of that video, literally half my letters would be picked up as well.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
It could be a combo of things. When you do a test cut (the circle with the square in it) does it come out ok? Usually for vinyl sign material I set my GX-24 at least to 130 or more and heat press vinyl is anywhere between 70 and 120 depending on the material. (we tried some new vinyl the other day for football jerseys and it was thick!)

I would suggest increasing the force and possibly try a new blade. Some of the vinyl can be rough and really dull a blade making the next job difficult. We always keep the older blade for a couple weeks just to make sure it was the problem when replacing it.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,428 Posts
It could be several things but I would start with a new blade. If the tip is broken or damaged it could cause the issue you are having. Also if it is tending to hand in the corners of letters it could be a dirty blade holder. The cutting strip also has a lot to do with cutting. If there is any groove or cut in the center of the strip it should be replaced. When I cut sign material my force is around 70 but then I use a 60 degree blade for about everything because I can use less force and get a better cut. The only time I have run into this issue (after doing a good test cut) is if the material is old. It tends to get brittle and doesn’t cut correctly.
So, if I were you as I have suggested I would try a new blade, if you are still having issues I would then clean the blade holder. Remove the blade wipe it down, add a single drop of clear oil to the blade and put it back in the holder and turn it a few times making sure it doesn’t bind, it should turn freely. Remove the blade from the holder and wipe off the extra oil, then put the blade back in. Also check the cap on the blade to make sure there isn’t any little pieces of material stuck in it. Put the cap back on the blade holder and try another test cut. Replace the cutting strip if it has any cuts or grooves. Try a different color material to see if it is just that roll that is causing the issue.
Hope this helps.
CW
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,639 Posts
Kevin I would ask if you are trying to weed sign vinyl or garment vinyl and if garment I would say you are doing cad-cut opposed to printable. As to force it varies based on machine or blade extension. So ensure you do not have a dirty blade holder and you ensure the tip is not chipped. David tells you about reverse weeding which is a great technique on thinner vinyls. Vinyl uses its adhesive to stick to the carrier, but on small letters not enough to keep it on the carrier when you weed so it stays with the greater mass. Also not mention is the brand of the vinyl. I usually give problematic vinyl two tries before I switch brands. JMHO
 

· Registered
Joined
·
736 Posts
As mentioned above, check your overcut settings. If you're using sign vinyl and not heat transfer vinyl, make sure your blade pressure is set so that it barely scratches the backer. If you cut into the backer, you'll also force some adhesive into it, making it harder to weed and more likely to stick together. Some sign cutters simply don't do well with tiny letters. I don't do signs as a main business so I only have a tiny personal craft cutter that works fine for doing samples or one-offs where a sign shop would charge someone the same price for one as for ten. 1" is pretty much my minimum for letters, and then only basic, simple letters, no serifs or fancy fonts. In fact, for as much lettering as in that sample, if you're going to do it regularly you may be better off setting up to print things like that.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
10,342 Posts
Maybe slow down the speed as well on finer detailed items. Use a ruler to hold down the vinyl while you are weeded small elements. We have also found static electricity can cause some pulling.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thank you all for the tips. I do both sign and shirt vinyl, but mainly see this with the sign vinyl.

It always appears to have a clean cut all he way through, but it's as if the glue is holding the smaller pieces on.

I will try the reverse weeding tomorrow, and also have some new blades on the way. Hopefully things will be much better in the days to come.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
736 Posts
It always appears to have a clean cut all he way through, but it's as if the glue is holding the smaller pieces on.
Again, check your pressure settings. Perfection would be not even seeing scratch marks on the backer. This is next to impossible, but keep the depth and pressure as low as possible

I will try the reverse weeding tomorrow, and also have some new blades on the way. Hopefully things will be much better in the days to come.
Even the best sign cutters sometimes don't like tiny letters. A lot of people prefer reverse weeding than fighting with it. The other trick is to cut a frame around the letters, so you only have to pull off a little bit of vinyl at a time, then you can pull off the bigger areas afterward.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,285 Posts
Thank you all for the tips. I do both sign and shirt vinyl, but mainly see this with the sign vinyl.

It always appears to have a clean cut all he way through, but it's as if the glue is holding the smaller pieces on.

I will try the reverse weeding tomorrow, and also have some new blades on the way. Hopefully things will be much better in the days to come.
I found environment (especially in Florida) that vinyl becomes harder to work with when its humid or warm. When I work with vinyl I have to turn our air up otherwise the vinyl becomes tacky and harder to weed. I have had to put vinyl in our shop fridge to harden up. :D
 

· Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Again, check your pressure settings. Perfection would be not even seeing scratch marks on the backer. This is next to impossible, but keep the depth and pressure as low as possible


Even the best sign cutters sometimes don't like tiny letters. A lot of people prefer reverse weeding than fighting with it. The other trick is to cut a frame around the letters, so you only have to pull off a little bit of vinyl at a time, then you can pull off the bigger areas afterward.
This is a good idea, and could be part of my problem. My shop is a little warm. I will give your suggestion a try as well and see what happens.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
736 Posts
I've been using Arlon calendared vinyls from Imprintables for years. I have an order of Oracal coming today and am hoping to see a big difference in the quality.
I love Oracal 651 since it provides the best quality for what might even be called a cheap price, especially for things like laptop decals and stick figure family (ick) stickers. 751 is rated for longer exposure but is thinner and harder to work with (but still easy compared to a lot of brands out there). 631 is also quite fun for temporary projects but you have to get the specific transfer tape for it or it won't stick. You may indeed find your weeding problems go down just by changing brands. I haven't used Arlon before so it may or may not show a difference.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I love Oracal 651 since it provides the best quality for what might even be called a cheap price, especially for things like laptop decals and stick figure family (ick) stickers. 751 is rated for longer exposure but is thinner and harder to work with (but still easy compared to a lot of brands out there). 631 is also quite fun for temporary projects but you have to get the specific transfer tape for it or it won't stick. You may indeed find your weeding problems go down just by changing brands. I haven't used Arlon before so it may or may not show a difference.
The 651 is what I have coming - that is very promising to hear :) Thank you!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
665 Posts
I started to say, what vinyl was you cutting. No amount of settings will help bad vinyl.

I had this happen to me once buying some cheap vinyl off ebay.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top