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Discussion Starter #1
I know I'm not the only one in Canada that thinks Canada post's rates are pretty prohibitive to shipping cheaply.
Has anyone toyed with the idea of vacuum sealing the t-shirt package before putting it in a Mylar pouch? It's odd..
I sent 1 shirt (no vacuum) in a baggie and then Mylar pouch and it cost me almost $5 to ship.. (didn't fit through their slot of doom).
I then vacuumed sealed (using my breath and a straw) 2 shirts and put it in the same Mylar envelope. Took it to the same post office and it fit through the slot and it cost me $1.80 to ship them. At over $3 savings per shipment, a vacuum sealer would pay for itself pretty quick.
Any thoughts?
 

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i have used a foodsaver for many years,
not for this particular purpose (but i might, 2 shirts for $1.80 is very tempting)

foodsaver wallyworld

($20 off)

excellent product,
and soon you will be buying your brown rice and oats in bulk and saving mucho dinero here too
 

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Discussion Starter #3
i have used a foodsaver for many years,
not for this particular purpose (but i might, 2 shirts for $1.80 is very tempting)

foodsaver wallyworld

($20 off)

excellent product,
and soon you will be buying your brown rice and oats in bulk and saving mucho dinero here too
Thanks Into the T.. Question for you.. Do you HAVE to use the foodsaver brand bags? I would think this would cut into the savings. I'd rather look into a sealer that allows one to use generic rolls. I mean, technically, it only needs to stay sealed till it's in the postal system.
 

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for long term storage the foodsaver bags we found to be worth the extra cost,
but for shorter term food storage (and probably t-shirts) the generic we found worked well
(i think we used the seal-a-meal bags, much cheaper)

keep us posted on your results
(but don't tell the feds we found a loophole in their monopoly)
 

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I dont want to prod, but were you using your foodsaver to package and distribute narcotics?
if you are addressing me, then the answer is no

i lived offgrid for many years and a foodsaver is indispensable,
as is canning, dehydrating,root vegetable storage, etc.

the foodsaver does work for shipping tee's, i was getting two adult large in one envelope
we ended up so busy locally that i kiboshed the packaging/shipping portion of the biz,
but i never had any issue at our post office when i did ship

you need to custom cut a piece of thin cardboard,
to ensure the tee does not crumple up in the vacuum process
you want a flat, air-free environ for the tee that just fits in the largest allowed envelope
 

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I didnt ask because I was looking for any, if thats what youre assuming. Thats not what I asked at all and I dont know why you would insinuate I was soliciting because I just wasnt. I just want to know about shirts. And conveyor dryers. etc.
 

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I didnt ask because I was looking for any, if thats what youre assuming. Thats not what I asked at all and I dont know why you would insinuate I was soliciting because I just wasnt. I just want to know about shirts. And conveyor dryers. etc.
is this not you below, where you specifically ask if ? used a foodsaver to package and distibute narcotics?

I dont want to prod, but were you using your foodsaver to package and distribute narcotics?
to which the totality of my response was a simple one word answer of 'no'
yet in that two letter word you were able to pry out all the gibberish above

what a world we live in
 

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We fold it into a poly bag and into a 9.5" x 12" Kraft envelope. Just before you give it to the post office guy make sure you flatten the package and it will slide through their plastic envelope thickness checker thingy. I've sent sizes up to XXL this way and $3.50 to $5 max shipping.
 
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