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Teflon on the top is ok but must be wiped after EVERY shirt is pretreated. If it were me I would take the teflon cover off the top and leave the bottom one on. I would also suggest using either the brown craft paper or silicon coated paper.

CURING EPSON INK:
45 Seconds for CMYK ONLY Prints - 350f - Light Pressure
90 Seconds for CMYK+W Printer - 350f - Light Pressure

Where did you get the 70 seconds of hovering and an additional 70 seconds from? Last thing..be sure to verify that your heat press is actually at the temperature indicated.
I would STRONGLY warn against taking off the top teflon cover - remember that the pre treatment fluid is salt based and the vapors that go up into the upper platen will cool and condense. Now you have salt (a corrosive chemical) on metal. It will corrode the metal parts over time. The upper platen cover prevents the steam / salt vapor from getting into that area.

I use an upper platen cover and kraft paper to ensure that the vapors do not get up there and that I get a dull finish that is clean on the pretreatment when it is cured.
 

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Steve, if the upper cover is left on have you done any test on the change in effective temperature? Mine seems to have a ten degree difference. Plus the change, temp drop, when pressing multiple shirts becomes harder to judge because the cover is cooling faster than the platen. Is there a teflon heat resistant tape to perhaps seal the press edges to prevent the vapors from entering the presses internal working.
 
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Randy - I would agree that there is a bit of a temperature difference but not significant. I run the press about 10 degrees higher than needed to compensate for it. I would rather check my temperature and run it a bit hot than to corrode away a $1800 heat press.
 

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I would STRONGLY warn against taking off the top teflon cover - remember that the pre treatment fluid is salt based and the vapors that go up into the upper platen will cool and condense. Now you have salt (a corrosive chemical) on metal. It will corrode the metal parts over time. The upper platen cover prevents the steam / salt vapor from getting into that area.

I use an upper platen cover and kraft paper to ensure that the vapors do not get up there and that I get a dull finish that is clean on the pretreatment when it is cured.


I would have to politely disagree. We have been using and distributing pretreatment from the very beginning it came out (2006 - wow, has it been that long :) ). We have never had one issue with corrosion on any of the long time heat presses we have here. We have never heard one complaint from the thousands of customers we have sold to. We do not use top teflon covers and neither do most, if not all, of our customers. As long as you use a cover sheet over the pretreat and over the finished print you should not have any problem. That is our experience.

_
 

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With all the respects to Steve.
Taking off is more accurate and more controllable.
Actually do not need to put on at first place.
I am saying this with my long experiences.
Dekay317 saying this with his production exprience not by behind desk or sales.
I hope you will find time for study further to compare.
Cheers! Inks are on me always.
 

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I've printed 30,000 prints via DTG and atleast 25,000 had pretreatment on them. I used Stahls 16x20 auto clam for every single one and not once have I ever seen any issues with corrosion on the heat press. Not to mention if your margins are where they should be...buying a new heat press every 5 years is peanuts compared to the profits generated.
 

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Strong arguments all!

I guess it is smackdown on Steve day :)

With all due respect to all of you, I have personally seen 2 heat presses that were used for pre treatment only that had massive corrosion on them. This was after several thousand shirts being run through them. The one facility that had a press with the upper cover and one without - no corrosion on the one with the cover and the other was rusted all up.

Run 10 degrees hotter to compensate = $0

Run at set temperature and risk corrosion over time = $1800 every few years.

I like my chances :)
 

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Run 10 degrees hotter to compensate = $0

Run at set temperature and risk corrosion over time = $1800 every few years.

I like my chances :)
Electricity isn't free so it will in effect cost more to heat the press an additional 10f.

$1800 split up over 3 years is only $1.64 per day...so it's not like the expense is that high.

However the real answer here is do what works successfully for you!! There is more than one way to skin a cat.
 

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Strong arguments all!

I guess it is smackdown on Steve day :)

With all due respect to all of you, I have personally seen 2 heat presses that were used for pre treatment only that had massive corrosion on them. This was after several thousand shirts being run through them. The one facility that had a press with the upper cover and one without - no corrosion on the one with the cover and the other was rusted all up.

Run 10 degrees hotter to compensate = $0

Run at set temperature and risk corrosion over time = $1800 every few years.

I like my chances :)

No smackdown intended at all. :)

It's always good to get different feedbacks on topics and your opinions are certainly appreciated. The point that some of us were making in response is that we have never seen corrosion on heat presses caused by pretreat. Nor heard of anyone having this issue. I can only speculate that if you have only seen it yourself at one company's facility it may have had more to do with something that company was doing then the pretreat causing an issue.

_
 

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Lol, not targeting you at all. When I post above I was at Detroit airport. Now in Philly :)
Heat transfer industry.( If someone came from) it works.
But not in DTG world. We are dealing with wet ink. We not dealing with back of heat transfer paper. Let's go next as title say.
Cheers! IA is on me always.
 

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It is 27 grams and on a 16x20. Is that enough?
This is only 16 grams for a 14"x14" area. Not quite enough.

A 16"x20" is 320 sq inches. At a total of 27 grams that's 27/320 = .084 grams per square inch.

So 196 sq inches is 196x.084 = 16.5 grams. You need 18-22 grams for best results.
 

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So I'm getting a yellow on a neon shirt. I used image armor on both sides and let it air dry and I still got a yellow stain. What is going on??
Not just neon shirts. Many other colors also stains Red, Grey etc. Weakest point of Ultra. However, there is none stain Pretreat available now. Use on both light and Dark.
Cheers! PTs are on me always.
 
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