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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,
This is my first post in this forum. I have done lots of research both inside and outside of this forum but have not found an undeniable answer to my question....

I am considering buying a cutter, either a Mimaki or a Roland (more than likely a Mimaki as i get good local support).

There are a number of reasons i need to purchase a cutter.... Vinyl heat transfers, transfer paper, decals etc.

Another BIG reason I am considering buying one is to do my own custom packaging and labels for merchandise.

I have done loads of searches on this forum and youtube etc. for tutorials and advice but everything always points back to the 'craft robo' which to me seems like a more entry level basic cutter machine (no offense).

So. my question is with:
1. a carrier sheet (some kind of plastic)
2. some non-permanent removable spray adhesive to stick the board onto the carrier sheet
is there any reason 'any' plotter (mimaki) couldn't do the same job as the craft robo...?:confused:

Thanks so much guys and gals!
Love this forum?!!! :)
juscruzzin
 

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Thanks for the reply hedsteve!! That sounds exactly along the lines of what i am trying to accomplish! Any more confirmations or relative stories would really back-up my case to buy a cutter!
 

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The Craft Robos are small cutters for contour cutting inkjet media, photo paper, scrapbooking, ect. If you are looking to cut heat applied vinyl, you will need to get a larger cutter as you will have to trim most vinyls to fit into this cutter.

As long as the cutter you purchase has an optic eye, then it will be able to contour cut like the Craft Robo.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for your reply nick. so in short any cutter with an optical eye can perform the simple function of cutting cardboard for packaging purposes :)
 

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Thanks for your reply nick. so in short any cutter with an optical eye can perform the simple function of cutting cardboard for packaging purposes :)
Well, an optic eye reads crop marks that you print, and then the cutter will go and cut out the outline that you have set up in your software.

Are you going to be printing crop marks on your cardboard stock?
 

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For packaging, I guess you could make do without a robo cutter? To cut the fold lines you can create your own dotted lines as fold lines, possibly space them further apart so it won't break off but will make it easier for you to fold your boxes/packages?

You could go without fold lines, but may become a hassle when you are folding a large number of boxes unless you have thought of a better method.
 

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Yeah, you should be able to do this no problem with any cutter, I cut cardstock for custom invitations with my cheap uscutters all the time, pretty hard on blades though. I am sure you could adjust things to just score the cardboard for fold lines, or do dotted as others have said.

If you are going to do alot of them, in the long run I think you could look into getting a custom die made to fit into some type of press for it.
 

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Well, an optic eye reads crop marks that you print, and then the cutter will go and cut out the outline that you have set up in your software.

Are you going to be printing crop marks on your cardboard stock?
Hey Nick, yes i will definitely be using crop marks and needing an optical eye because my goal is to pre-print packaging designs on boxes etc and then have the cutter cut the outline and score the folds etc.
 

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For packaging, I guess you could make do without a robo cutter? To cut the fold lines you can create your own dotted lines as fold lines, possibly space them further apart so it won't break off but will make it easier for you to fold your boxes/packages?

You could go without fold lines, but may become a hassle when you are folding a large number of boxes unless you have thought of a better method.
Yes i have seen a couple of Vids on youtube of someone cutting perforations for folds. Also thought this was a great idea and like you say as long as the cuts are spread apart shouldn't present any tearing problems...
 

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Yeah, you should be able to do this no problem with any cutter, I cut cardstock for custom invitations with my cheap uscutters all the time, pretty hard on blades though. I am sure you could adjust things to just score the cardboard for fold lines, or do dotted as others have said.

If you are going to do alot of them, in the long run I think you could look into getting a custom die made to fit into some type of press for it.
Agreed!! Cutting packaging like this will be time consuming. My quantity will be small in the beginning... hopefully if things pick up i can organize die's etc.
 

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I would go with the die or a flatbed cutter. A roll cutter isnt really made to cut cardstock.
Totally agree and have also seen some flatbed cutters on youtube!!! They look great and purpose built but i do not have access to that type of equipment (i am based in Vietnam). So i will have to make do with the roll cutter solution until my volume picks up.

They are certainly an interesting piece of equipment though!
 
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