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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, i understand the separation process and create seps in both illustrator and photoshop, i do my tonal seps in photoshop using a mix of experience and T-Seps, I can usually get the desired results but struggle with tonal bases on dark shirts, I have tried a number of things with varying results. I use a studio sometimes and they tend to do an excellent job but are pretty reluctant to talk about how they do theirs??

Any suggestions on this would be very welcome. I am talking about tonal bases for tonal work in Photoshop.
 

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I can usually get the desired results but struggle with tonal bases on dark shirts
Hmmm.... What are "tonal bases"?

Anyway... I really don't see the difficulty in doing separations... It's really easy most of the time.
For most designs 4-6 colors is good enough, which is great as I only have a 6 color press.
Below are some quick examples I created in a couple of minutes using GIMP. No plugins or anything.
Just to be clear, these are not my designs, and are used for demonstration purposes only.

This design has just 5 colors, including the white, but the black has been removed.
Screenshot Font Software Multimedia software Event

Here is the original design before the color separation, with nearly 350,000 colors.
Screenshot Font Software Fictional character Video game software

Here is a close-up of the separated image and the palette of the 5 colors used.
Rectangle Font Screenshot Software Electronic device

The color palette can be printed and color matched with actual inks.

Here is another example demonstrating the difference between using 5 and 8 colors.
Personally, I would happily print this with 5 colors.
Organism Font Screenshot Adaptation Software
Photograph World Organism Font Screenshot
Font Line Rectangle Screenshot Display device
 

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The basic start for what I think you mean by "tonal bases" here is to take the RGB image, judiciously convert to grayscale, then invert it, and there's your white base. Adjustments may or may not be necessary. What I mean by "judiciously" is that adjustments to the color image first should be made before converting to grayscale. In Photoshop, under Adjustments in the Image menu, there is Black & White, which lets you adjust the different densities by color and see what your grayscale will look like. GIMP may have that too, but I have no experience with it, but I'll bet that Bob would know that one.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hmmm.... What are "tonal bases"?

Anyway... I really don't see the difficulty in doing separations... It's really easy most of the time.
For most designs 4-6 colors is good enough, which is great as I only have a 6 color press.
Below are some quick examples I created in a couple of minutes using GIMP. No plugins or anything.
Just to be clear, these are not my designs, and are used for demonstration purposes only.

This design has just 5 colors, including the white, but the black has been removed.
View attachment 277173
Here is the original design before the color separation, with nearly 350,000 colors.
View attachment 277174
Here is a close-up of the separated image and the palette of the 5 colors used.
View attachment 277170
The color palette can be printed and color matched with actual inks.

Here is another example demonstrating the difference between using 5 and 8 colors.
Personally, I would happily print this with 5 colors.
View attachment 277177 View attachment 277178 View attachment 277179
Thanks Bob, i've never looked at GIMP i'll have to check it out - thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The basic start for what I think you mean by "tonal bases" here is to take the RGB image, judiciously convert to grayscale, then invert it, and there's your white base. Adjustments may or may not be necessary. What I mean by "judiciously" is that adjustments to the color image first should be made before converting to grayscale. In Photoshop, under Adjustments in the Image menu, there is Black & White, which lets you adjust the different densities by color and see what your grayscale will look like. GIMP may have that too, but I have no experience with it, but I'll bet that Bob would know that one.

Steve
The basic start for what I think you mean by "tonal bases" here is to take the RGB image, judiciously convert to grayscale, then invert it, and there's your white base. Adjustments may or may not be necessary. What I mean by "judiciously" is that adjustments to the color image first should be made before converting to grayscale. In Photoshop, under Adjustments in the Image menu, there is Black & White, which lets you adjust the different densities by color and see what your grayscale will look like. GIMP may have that too, but I have no experience with it, but I'll bet that Bob would know that one.

Steve
Hi Steve, thanks for that I have made the bases that way in the past and it usually gives good results - i'm going to have a look at GIMP and see if it's anythig new - thanks
 
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