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You can get PermaSet here in the U.S. just google. It's here. Number of places carry it in pints, quarts, gallons and 4 gallon containers.

I'm not sure what the "best" brand of garment is. That's all very subjective. Whenever I say anything about printing, I'm always referring to AA. It is all I use. Mostly 100% cotton but I do offer a few designs on 50/50. AA works best for ME, because...I like it, and I have built a dedicated and loyal core of customers who like it too. When they purchase a tee or hoodie, etc from me, they know it's on AA.

But again, all subjective to your likes/dislikes, what you charge per garment, etc.

I'm not familiar with Enviroline, is that the older Ryonet stuff? Regardless, it shouldn't be running down the back of your screen no matter what brand. Are you sure you are not flooding too hard?

I use 180 pretty much exclusively, a small percentage of 200, one or two 230's and I even use one or two 156-160's none have issues with inks running down the back. Make sure you mix your ink real well too before you are using it.

How are you using a fan with your conveyor? You don't want it blowing into the tunnel from one of the ends IMHO. And your cure time if you are around 300-310 needs to be longer than 2 minutes. 2-3 minutes at 320. You can cheat it a tad and go to 360 but not much higher, for 90 seconds. At 300 degrees you might be needing 4+ minutes per garment to cure.

PS - I'm not sure if I'm THAT knowledgable about this stuff. I just switched to WB one day from plastisol and I had orders to fulfill. I had no choice really but to figure it out fast! :) I still learn something new every day.

#1 rule to printing WB? DON'T PANIC!
 

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Ok.... I am stepping in on this post and if I need to start somewhere else I can...
I am new to water based inks and have a lot of questions for Porkchopharry because he is experienced and has some awesome points! Please help me with where my process could be wrong and offer advice where needed. I catalog my screens as you do (no special orders) they are my designs.
1. I have someone make my screens and they are either 180 or 220 mesh
2. I have tried many of my screens (none have worked) the water based ink (Enviroline) literally runs down the back side of my screen like water which puts big blots of ink on the garments
3. I use a conveyor dryer with a fan for 2 minutes to reach a temp of 300-310 with a temp gun
4. In your experience what is the best shirts to use for water based inks (I have Next level, American Apparel, Tultex etc...) and which fabric blend...I want to go with ONE brand that works best for water based ink to just go ahead and weed out that one problem because my line of clothing depends on consistency
5. you use Permaset inks and I can only find those in the UK...

Basically, I have read many many many of your posts and you have an awesome handle on water based inks and printing and I am using all of your points to hopefully help minimize more mistakes for me in the future. Thanks in advance and keep up the great work.

Rhonda
Ryonet sells co-branded Matsui as Enviroline. I printed discharge with it (same exact base and pigments just with the addition of the discharge activator). I use 156 screens and had no problems with the ink bleeding through.

How much pigment are you adding? The pigment is pretty runny; you should be putting in at most 10% by weight, as per the instructions ... AH! Think I got it. On the label does it say 301 PC? If so, we just found your problem. PC is just pigment solution, not a premixed ink. You must mix the 301 PC pigment with ink base, which is thick. Premixed ink is labeled as 301 RC.

If that is not what is going on, then it sounds like your ink is bad.
 

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Well I just looked and all of the Enviroline that I have say 301 RC. LOL! I have just wasted a lot of expensive pigment trying to figure out why it was dripping through my screen. Thank you so much!

I would still like some answers to the other problems/questions that I had if anyone wouldn't mind.

Rhonda
 

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Well shoot, I just noticed I had it backwards.... I have the 301 RC which is not the pigment, so I guess all of my ink is bad then. All of the ink is the consistency of a really runny honey a little thicker than water.

Rhonda
 

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I'm not familiar with Enviroline, is that the older Ryonet stuff? Regardless, it shouldn't be running down the back of your screen no matter what brand. Are you sure you are not flooding too hard?
Yes it is the old Ryonet ink... maybe too old. I will definitely try the other ink... starting my search now.

Rhonda
 

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Well I just looked and all of the Enviroline that I have say 301 RC. LOL! I have just wasted a lot of expensive pigment trying to figure out why it was dripping through my screen. Thank you so much!

I would still like some answers to the other problems/questions that I had if anyone wouldn't mind.

Rhonda
This one has regular and Supercover versions of Permaset:
Permaset Aqua :: Water Based Screen Printing Inks

This one only has Supercover, but pricing might be a little better--depending on what size you want (they also have premixed RC Matsui):
Waterbase Ink : McLogan Supply Company

If you are printing light ink on dark shirts, then Supercover is something to investigate, as you can avoid having to print an underbase or using discharge (which works great but may not be as safe to work with everyday). If you print dark ink on light shirts, then you can use pretty much anything.

As to shirts, American Apparel has a fine and tight weave without a lot of random fibers sticking up, so it could take a finely detailed print well. I also use Hanes Beefy-T because from the customer perspective the fit and weight of the shirt is usually what matters most and different people like different fit and weight of shirt. Both have good brand recognition and are considered premium brands. Still, lots and lots of Gildan shirts are sold and cost you half as much ... Other than shirts with lots of stray fibers, you can print regular (non discharge) ink on anything and get good results. It's really a matter of what styles you want to offer and the fitment preferences of your customers. Uhm, though some inks require special additives if used on synthetic blends to avoid dye migration (Permaset does not).
 

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I would still like some answers to the other problems/questions that I had if anyone wouldn't mind.

Rhonda
I think you answered the big question in regards to ink. :)

Again as far as tee brand, it's very subjective.

Lot's of good reasosn to stick with one brand. I do. For a number of reasons.

As you build a customer base even just having one brand across your entire line can not only be confusing to your customer to decide on. But it becomes confusing and hell-ish for you to keep up with what you need keep in stock. Multiply that by two or three different brands, and it gets stupid. It's hard enough juggling a stock of blanks for tee, hoodie, tank, etc blanks for just one brand. Much less 2 or more.

Confusing your customer by having one garment on one brand that fits like this, and another garment on another brand that fits like that. Or, even worse - one garment on this brand costs this much, and then another garment on that brand, costs that much.... Just creates confusion and will drive them away. Trust me...been there.

Personally, I want one brand with the widest selection of garments and colors, to me USA made is very important, and also I want to be able to depend on them to get me my stuff on time. Also, the results I desire and expect. But again, the results I desire and expect. They may not be the same as anyone else. And neither result or expectation is wrong.

So...then I guess you want to find that one that works for you and your pricing structure - which is another sticking point. And we're all different in what we like. So...best advice there is to print on a bunch of stuff, and see what works best for you and offers you what you need.

You want to use ONE brand, I agree with you. That's what I do. But, the only way to determine what works is getting down with it. Because in reality while AA may work great for me, it may be the pits for you. It's one of those "there's no substitute for experience and experimentation" type of things I guess.
 

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This was a great post! read the entire thing. I'm bias here as well as I started my business 4 months ago and never have used plastisol. To me the tipping factor was the ability to clean everything with just water. dealing with all the chemicals of plastisol was a big deterrent for me. I have done dark garments with Comet White and gotten away with 2 passes no flash most of the time on 200 count screens. It really looks better if you do pass/flash/pass but for faded looks and most underbase, one good hit is good enough.
 

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OK flood before you print so flood - print - flood since the patches are where the ink is drying in the mesh.

Load more ink in your screen but first ensure that you have mixed the ink until it is nice and creamy then load ink and flood the screen with ink covering the design, do your stroke no off contact with water based and flood again always keeping the design in the screen covered with ink.
Hood says to 'Fill' the screen, not flood it, on thick white ink. That means do a heavy pull with the screen off the shirt......Then he just does one push and it comes out pretty good. Using this ink at present.....it is a challenge .....also need have a thick stencil on the screen to make room for the ink..

z
 

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Hood says to 'Fill' the screen, not flood it, on thick white ink. That means do a heavy pull with the screen off the shirt......Then he just does one push and it comes out pretty good. Using this ink at present.....it is a challenge .....also need have a thick stencil on the screen to make room for the ink..

z
That is for Plastisol, which sits on top of the fabric. Waterbase goes into the fabric, so all that "thick gasket" blather goes out the window. For opaque waterbase, the first hit partially absorbs into the surface; flash that, then build more opacity over it. If you managed to put a huge load of white waterbase on in one stroke, it is likely to go all the way through the shirt.
 

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This ole thread inspired me to go play with Comet White, i needed add a good bit of water to get it printable. As it was like marshmellow fluff it instantly clogs screens. Has to be thinned down in my case. I like Matsui stretch White myself. P/F/P and the feel is very soft and stretchable with no cracking ever.
 
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