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Hi Guys,

I was wondering if anyone has used a normal iron to transfer on to t-shirts. If so how successful are the results and what settings where used?

We basically what to enable the end user to be able to iron on prints themselves.

Paul
 

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They work alright. I have some shirts that I did a while back before I bought a heat press with an iron and they're still alive.

You generally put the iron to the hottest cotton setting, no steam. Cut the transfer very close to the image to reduce the border effect. Most importantly, apply HEAVY pressure when pressing down onto the transfer with the iron; use both hands, with some decent leverage. This is the single most important thing to do when using an iron I'd say.

If you're selling/giving out transfers to people to iron on, make sure you include some directions with them. Whatever transfers you buy (some sort of cold-peel variety most likely) should come with some instructions for use as well.
 

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Aye, pressure is paramount which is somewhat difficult with an iron. I've used them before but didn't apply enough pressure and the transfers just peeled. Like Twinge said depatch your transfers with an easy to follow guide, i'd purchase a pack from Staples are see what settings they require and go from there.
 

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Hey guys,

Just did my first tee yesterday using iron on Avery paper. Its an image and a sentence and I cut down the paper as much as possible however the paper outlined managed to stay on the shirt. It's also kinda stiff. I washed it and nothing changed. The image itself looks fine though. Anything I can do next time to prevent the paper outline, less pressure maybe?

Thanks in advance for your suggestions.
 

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Hi,
I did a transfer with a Hanes Tshirt Maker kit and it looked okay but got all messed up when I stretched the shirt to put it on.
Did I do something wrong? Which heat transfers that you can do with an iron work well?
I am also new in this forum and I am trying to start my tshirt business.
Thank you!
Juan Jones
 

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I haven't had ANY luck using an iron. I could stand on the thing while I'm ironing, and it still peels in certain spots. It also turns out really stiff and shiny, and if you have to cut out the transfer, I still end up with outlines of where the transfers were. I give up on irons!
 

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There's only so much you can do with an iron alone. For the few Iron-on transfers I've done in the past, Avery paper is the best I used (the only other one I used was Office Depot brand, though). Very heavy pressure for the time recommended in the included sheet is all I did and they turned out fairly well, but they did have a definate wax window (the border around the image). There's not much you can do about that... If you have a square (or other sharp-cornered) image you could try cutting right to the image. And of course, make sure you're doing very light (preferably white) shirts. You might also try a better quality shirt depending on what you're using; a transfer may seep in better into a little bit thicker shirt. (e.g. use Gildan 6.1oz shirts instead of 5.4oz shirts.)

Your best bet, though, might be to just get someone with a heat press to make the shurt for you. You very likely have a handful of local shops that can do it, otherwise you can get someone online (such as myself) to make one for you (though you take a hit on shipping costs then, of course).
 

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TERRIBLE! I just ordered the iron all heat transfers to use in a printer and put them on a 100% heavy cotton Gilden tees(using an iron) for my students. Every one came out with mistakes. Pieces missing, cracking, dull color etc. I'm horrified. This project was for a grant and I don't know what to do! They are coming to see our final project and I am in a complete bind. I have bought transfers from the dollar store that work 100% better. Help please!:(:(
 

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TERRIBLE! I just ordered the iron all heat transfers to use in a printer and put them on a 100% heavy cotton Gilden tees(using an iron) for my students. Every one came out with mistakes. Pieces missing, cracking, dull color etc. I'm horrified. This project was for a grant and I don't know what to do! They are coming to see our final project and I am in a complete bind. I have bought transfers from the dollar store that work 100% better. Help please!:(:(
Ironall has some issues with flaking, and you have to be careful with that. It also helps to make sure that no flakes are on the print. As to the other issues, that is probably related to the fact that you used a home iron. If I am not mistaken, they tell you you can use it with a home iron, but ithink it would be better to have a heat press. At this point, you probably are better off using a store boughten brand. Or getting a service to do it for you.
 

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I have been kicking around this biz for over 7 years and I have yet to see a commercially viable product using a home iron...just not enough heat/pressure/time consistently applied..
 

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One additional factor may be that newer home use irons in the US have lower heat settings than those of older vintage models (like from the 50's). The manufacturers don't want to get sued when people burn themselves through user error. Irons from other countries might run hotter, but there are voltage conversion issues if you try to use them in the US. Older irons are also heavier, which might help a bit with pressure.

Vi
 

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TERRIBLE! I just ordered the iron all heat transfers to use in a printer and put them on a 100% heavy cotton Gilden tees(using an iron) for my students. Every one came out with mistakes. Pieces missing, cracking, dull color etc. I'm horrified. This project was for a grant and I don't know what to do! They are coming to see our final project and I am in a complete bind. I have bought transfers from the dollar store that work 100% better. Help please!:(:(
what surface are you printing on. If you are using an ironing board then that is not good. Use a flat surface, hard. Then place a large mouse pad (Tee Pad It's) and press on that. they can take the heat. Follow the instructions from the transfer company. Be sure to use plenty of pressure and press at least 20 seconds in each area of the transfer following a clockwise direction. Be consistant. I don't know your time limit for getting this done.
 

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Pre-press the shirt for 5-7 seconds before you begin to make sure your shirt is 'dry' before pressing.

Follow Lou's advice all the way, he is the most experienced guy on the board with all of this stuff. I used an iron and did these on a formica counter with a pillow case under or best results. My advice is to get the biggest guy you have and put him up on a stool so he can lean his body weight down on the iron. Crank that iron as hot as it can go. Peel that backing off while the image is "hot" don't let it cool off.

I got the best results with Ironall using a preshrunk shirt made of 50 cotton and 50 poly. 100% cotton faded.

The ink in your printer should be Pigment ink, not dye. Dye will wash out with Ironall, but if you only need the shirts for one day, they will look good the first day, what happens in the wash won't matter. They may or may not fade. My best combo, pigment ink and 50/50 shirts.

Like Lou said, I don't know if it's all a day late and dollar short, but if not, best wishes resolving the issue.
 

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Why do people keep saying not to use an ironing board? What's the reason? It's firm and heat resistant.
I did my first shirts on a table with 2 or 3 shirts under it and I melted the finish from the table onto the bottom (scrap) shirt.

About to do my first black shirt iron on, doing a practice run before I do a shirt I REALLY want for Monday. I'm using Joelee's paper from Michael's as the white worked great (though I should have cut all around!) but there are other types available there.

Now that it's 2016, are there really good iron on papers? Was about to buy a heat press in October than bailed. Now it looks like it would have been a good idea when clients want shirts close to xmas and I can't wait for shirts to get to Ontario from California.
 

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I'm curious as to why people resurrect 8 year old threads instead of starting a new one. But that's just me. Forum etiquette, please.
 

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I'm curious as to why people resurrect 8 year old threads instead of starting a new one. But that's just me. Forum etiquette, please.
most don't pay attention to the post date and reply to it since that's what there doing. The person before your post is using a iron and i always tell people to never use a iron it's too much work and almost never work right. She also said she is using Michaels iron paper which is bs paper to start with. She bail on getting a heatpress which was a mistake. If you can't afford to do it right then don't do it at all as it's just going to frustrate you. Look at all the answers of it not working. Why waste time after other have for you. Time is money in this business.
 

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I'm curious as to why people resurrect 8 year old threads instead of starting a new one. But that's just me. Forum etiquette, please.
Not sure where you've been hanging out. Forum etiquette typically dictates a member search the forum for an answer to their question which may already have been asked DOZENS of times. Why flood the system with duplicate questions?

Of course I saw the old date on the post. But I had a related question.

If the admins didn't want people replying to old posts, they'd lock them or delete them.

Then again I'm new here FWIW.

Ok I guess TECHNICALLY it was new question.
 
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