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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to order one of the shirts from my Cafeshop to see what the quality is like. I'm just worried about the transfer lines from the transfer paper! I know the technology & supplies these days have come a long way from the days of iron-ons, but you still see some bad quality heat transfer out there!
Any of you satisfied/dissatisfied with the image quality from Cafepress?
 

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Hi

I had a few t-shirts on cafepress and have just received one of them that I purchased myself to check the quality and to be honest I thought the quality was pretty poor. The image was quite fuzzy (Though I supplied at the correct resolution, and didn't res up or anything). The image was a 3d illustration I created in Strata then imported into PShop. Maybe people are having better results with solid vector type style images?

I have closed down my cafepress store and am looking into Spreadshirt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
TROskell said:
Hi

I had a few t-shirts on cafepress and have just received one of them that I purchased myself to check the quality and to be honest I thought the quality was pretty poor. The image was quite fuzzy (Though I supplied at the correct resolution, and didn't res up or anything). The image was a 3d illustration I created in Strata then imported into PShop. Maybe people are having better results with solid vector type style images?

I have closed down my cafepress store and am looking into Spreadshirt.
Thanks for the heads up! I just ordered from my store as well to see what the quality is like. If it's poor then I'll close my store & just continue to develop my line.

NARC72
 

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I agree. Ordered one test shirt...thought it was a little cheap and nasty. And expensive.
 

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TROskell said:
Maybe people are having better results with solid vector type style images?
While I have no experience with Cafepress... I always have better results with screenprinting graphics I create in Illustrator. Vectors are razor sharp.
 

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I've ordered several cafepress shirts and the quality has been pretty darn good.

With artwork varying from simple text to full color designs with fades, they all seem to come out pretty well. They usually trim the transfer so you don't see much of the edges, and like most transfers, the edges usually dissappear completely after the first wash.

They are also using the new direct printing on a few of their products (to be launched on all of their products later). I've seen a few samples of the direct printing and the print quality is pretty close to screen printing or dye sublimation. There are a few color shifts, but definitely a step up from the heat transfer in my opinion.

They also stand behind what they sell, so if you don't like what you purchased, you can send it back for a refund or a reprint (because it's print on demand, you will get the odd misprint).

Part of it has to do with expectations I think. If you're expecting a screen printed t-shirt when you order from CafePress, you'll probably be dissappointed. If not, I think you'll dig the design and the printing.

I've sold through cafepress since 1999 and I've had very few returns (and lots of sales). If there was a quality problem overall, I would expect the return rate to be much higher.
 

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What I expected on the first value tee I bought from my CP shop a couple years ago was one of those tees that are so thin you can see through the material - those thin ones that remind me of gauze - Hanes or not ... that was what I was expecting. I also expected the color to fade to nothing after washing it 2 or 3 times.

Every value t-shirt (and one ringer for my daughter) I have bought from CP has been a quality product from the very first one to the ones I bought that arrived a few weeks ago. The color is still great two years later - just faded normally from all the washings.

Some of my paintings on value t-shirts have not turned out to my expectations. They are okay if I had never seen the oil painting to know what it actually looked like :) (customers are not going to see the "original oil painting" but others (particularly the digital painting ones) have been totally gorgeous - though they are still the heat transfer, not direct printing. I can't speak to direct printing yet but I've been very happy with all my CP tees I've ordered.
 

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I'vehad both crappy t- shirts and very nice ones from cafepress. They are trying out new printing on most of the t- shirts this year. My guess is that they want to test it.
But you can tell if the quality is poor or sharp after the design has been placed. You'd think this would give them some evidence?
My guess is as good as yours....
Sorry to hear that some of you aren't pleased. I will let cafepress know about this if you pm me with your customer info. Have you contacted them yourself?
Their rules are very strict on this topic, they will replace any product that doesn't turn out right free of charge. You get to keep the crappy t- shirt to.
If you didn't know about this, I'd take advantage of this right away before it's to late to!
Camie
 

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I have bought some of my own Cafepress designs and they appear to be better than the heat transfer paper you can buy in the local store. You can also tell that Cafepress is a well organized and developed company. Great customer service and great interaction with shop owners. One thing you have to think about is that they are an inkjet heat transfer company (for garments) (working towards different processes however). They seem to be the best in their field. And this type of process is good for many different designs and good for a certain market. Obviously they are great for photos and intricate designs but maybe this process is not necessary for simple designs like text-only. For me, my designs are text-only. I feel that inkjet heat transfer is not what really what I am looking for. I don't want there to be any evidence whatsoever of the film from the transfer. I know some say that it washed out but I have several text-only designs and the outlines are all still evident. I would not call this bad quality but rather a type of technology that I do not prefer. I screenprint my shirts and am buying a vinyl cutter to try heat transfer vinyl like Spreadshirt uses. I like screenprinting but feel that vinyl might be a step up for what I am looking for.

I guess the bottom line is each designer has to decide whether inkjet heat transfer is a good match for their designs and market too. It is a good idea to explore all technologies while examining your market.
 
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