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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all...

I am curious about why so many t-shirt designers/artists/sellers do not relabel.

When I launched my business (boutique tees for babies and toddlers) I had woven labels sewn in. I noticed when other onesie companies didn't do that and I noticed that so many use American Apparel. So, I went with a private label manufacturer and used woven labels. It wasn't cheap.

But, from reading many, many, many posts and threads it looks like it doesn't really matter to a lot of your customers. True?

I am stuck on this topic because we are about to launch some designs for moms and don't have much interest in having woven labels with our logo sewn in because we're just testing the market and designs.

Looking for your feedback to determine if we even bother relabeling or heat transfering or Gocco-ing our own care label.



 

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LaMamaHen said:
I am curious about why so many t-shirt designers/artists/sellers do not relabel.


It depends on who it is who's not doing the relabelling, but to be perfectly blunt I think the leading reason is laziness and the inability to find the resources needed to get it done. Obviously some people view it as unnecessary, others research it and conclude it's not worth it, etc. There are many considered reasons why one could choose not to do it, but I don't think the majority of sellers are making a choice (I'm basing this opinion on my local market, so it may not be applicable to a wider area).

LaMamaHen said:
So, I went with a private label manufacturer and used woven labels. It wasn't cheap.


...which is the reason that some might look into it, then decide not to bother.

LaMamaHen said:
But, from reading many, many, many posts and threads it looks like it doesn't really matter to a lot of your customers. True?


It depends a lot on the market, but I think it's fair to say that a great many customers don't care at all (or even necessarily notice).

Some people have suggested that the original tag could even be a good thing, because it shows you're using a quality brand. Personally I feel that's only true if you're using a trendy sweatshop free brand (like AA), and doesn't help if you're using a good but generic brand (like Hanes). The hip-hop market may be different, I don't know (I get the impression leaving the Luxe label in would be a good thing).

I've said before that I think the biggest reason to relabel is ego. It feels good to have your own label sewn in. Makes you feel more professional, feels nice to achieve something, makes you feel like you've created a better product than your competitors, helps make that final product that little bit more real for you. Ego. It's like having your name in lights. There's nothing wrong with that - we're in business for ourselves to improve our lives. The end goal of making money isn't having a higher number in your bank account, it's using that money to improve your life. Part of improving your life is job satisfaction. If cutting into your profit margins for woven labels makes you happy, then it's worthwhile.

If woven labels don't float your boat, there are sound business reasons for putting them in in some markets, but overall it's probably not necessary. If you were using a cheap Chinese import shirt it would be best to cover the cheap paper label with something more expensive looking, but if you're using a professional blank t-shirt then you're more likely to be relabelling the shirt for yourself than for your customers.

If you are placing shirts into higher end retail, that's different, you'd definitely want to put your own labels in. That said, aa (for example) may have enough cachet now that you could leave those in.

LaMamaHen said:
I am stuck on this topic because we are about to launch some designs for moms and don't have much interest in having woven labels with our logo sewn in because we're just testing the market and designs.


If you're testing the market and don't have an interest in getting labels sewn in... I wouldn't get labels sewn in.

 

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LaMamaHen said:
Looking for your feedback to determine if we even bother relabeling or heat transfering or Gocco-ing our own care label.
what brand label would you use...... if you left the original label on the shirt ?

- this will play a part in your market zone and with your client base.

A label is a signature that tells consummers who the item is made by.
It's like a stamp seal of approval by you that your item is 1st quality.

This is why when you buy items/shirts that are second quality, manufactures usually slice a knife cut thru the label. This is to alert consummers that its not their first quality goods.

I've read alot of your posts on this topic, I can see you are doing a lot of research on it. Good Job.
 

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I think a label is a good idea as long as its within your budget, it can make a difference to customers though. I know that when I have a t-shirt i often look at the label and unique design/logo displayed there. It's not essential but a good touch and could be used for additional marketing support.

Nick.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Solmu said:


I've said before that I think the biggest reason to relabel is ego. It feels good to have your own label sewn in. Makes you feel more professional, feels nice to achieve something, makes you feel like you've created a better product than your competitors, helps make that final product that little bit more real for you. Ego.

Solmu said:
If you are placing shirts into higher end retail, that's different, you'd definitely want to put your own labels in. That said, aa (for example) may have enough cachet now that you could leave those in.
Interesting. Ego.
Actually, we do wholesale to high end and the woven logo label was about two things: Customer and niche protection.

When we researched the idea, we didn't find anyone else doing what we thought of. So, the logo label was a way to start out front and possibly stay out front until we get copied. (Have since seen other tees marketed to our niche, but no private label and no packaging and little boutique business.)

Also, I spent nearly two decades as a newspaper reporter. Given that we had something unique I knew my chances of getting free newspaper publicity was to look bigger than we are and go custom, custom, custom. That has paid off. Even the smallest brief in a newspaper has meant sales.

My gut is telling me the personalized labels wouldn't be that big a deal for an adult tee. But, that is a question we're still trying to answer for ourselves. Your feedback helps a lot.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
LucyRoberts said:
what brand label would you use...... if you left the original label on the shirt ?

- this will play a part in your market zone and with your client base.
We just ordered some Article 1 samples. I like the fact they offer organic. So, even if we leave their label in, we can market the organic factor. Nice shirts, by the way.

LucyRoberts said:
I've read alot of your posts on this topic, I can see you are doing a lot of research on it. Good Job.
Thank you. It's the recovering reporter in me. ;)
 

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I think Solmu covered a lot of the points :)

For some markets, a custom label can make you stand out. For others, it can be an unnecessary expense.

From the "average" customer end of things, I doubt they care what company it says in the label.

I think it's mostly important to the t-shirt designers/companies to make their stuff stand out or to make it seem like they are more professional.

I've seen companies that sell 1000's of shirts a month leave the regular label in :)
 
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