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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
After another crazy busy week, I finally have time to add some more tips:

1. After you have the designs for your collection, organize it with a template. Stock t-shirt templates can be found here: Blank Vector Clothing | Vector T Shirt Template | T-****rs Vector | Outlaw Design Blog - A Graphic Design Blog

Royalty free stock images | Lightbox 't-shirt templates for designers' managed by circler | iStockphoto.com

I just googled t-shirt templates and those two links stuck out the most. A template for your designs will help you approach printers and allow your printers to have a better idea of what printing techniques you are looking for. It also lets them know the locations of your prints as well which can be hard to explain without visual aid.

2. Once you have your collection templates complete, think about other things you wish to have done for your branding. Do you want custom neck labels? Do you want hang tags? If so, this is the time to design those things before approaching anyone.

3. Now that you are fairly organized with your line, approaching printers, tag makers, and other vendors will be a lot easier because you know what you want. Always know what you want before presenting yourself to garment embellishers.

4. Now you might want to think about creating look books, a look book contains your new seasons collections that you can promote your brand with. (this is an option if you plan to sell to retailers). If you do not want look books, another option would be to create a simple website with an online collection portfolio so that your perspective buyers can instantly check your brand out.

5. Don't be cheap on your final garments, most clients work so hard to design and promote their brand, but shy away on spending money on final quality products. Afterall your product IS your brand.
 

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hi there thanks for all that information. it was a useful read. im just testing the water at the moment, got my first sale yesterday on my first day :) but in the uk the tshirt market is very saturated, and everybody is sceptical of a brand or website of its not a big name, so im keeping my fingers crossed for another.
 

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Thanks for all threads you guys.

I've been in running Tees design for a couple years and I'd love to tell you one more thing I've learned from my experience.

" Always do the design one for to show what you are and what's your theme (90% of all your tees)
and one for to make money (10%) [what people want; V-neck, black tees, yellow tees, .etc. for the example ] "
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
1. I just wanted to share this site for those who are just starting out and aren't so great with color schemes. This site should help pick your the colors for your designs.

COLOURlovers :: Color Forums

2. I'm not quite sure if this has been mentioned before, but if you are looking for a specific quality, fit, feel, and prices on your blank garments, feel free to request samples from your printer or vendor. Of course you will probably need to pay for them, but at least you can compare them for yourselves instead of asking just for recommendations.

3. If you are going to make an online catalog, a lookbook, or anything else that will showcase your clothing, take the time to do it right. There is nothing worse then to see all the effort put into a clothing line, but their final presentation is horrifying as if the photos were taken with a cell phone camera. If you can't afford a professional photographer, try searching for a photographer who might barter for some free shirts, or someone looking for portfolio work. If not, you can always ask a designer to photoshop them on a model/blank t-shirt.

4. I don't think pricing has been brought up so here goes. Although the retail price of your garment is soley up to you, there is a general rule you should follow. If you decide that your retail price will be $20, your wholesale price may be $10. Basically your retail price is 2x your wholesale price.

5. Don't price your apparel too cheap. Customers love low prices, but this is where psychology comes into play. Tshirt prices below $10 may be perceived as a cheap quality tshirt that will rip with a few washes. $20-25 tshirts is a good median, not too high, not too low for most clothing brands and the customer will feel as if they are paying for a decent quality tshirt. $20 is enough to cover your costs, and make a profit (of course this is all relative, but generally speaking).
Tshirts costing $35 and above, should be for clothing brands who are playing in the higher class sector. There is a growing audience for $35 tshirts, so don't be shy! If you believe your brand is worthy of $35 tshirts, then your customers will probably pay for it.

6. Research a bit about preparing your artwork for your printer. I just saw a video from Linty Fresh about preparing artwork which may be helpful to you guys: The LF Blog. He also has a good point where he says that your printer will be more willing to work with you if you save them a lot of the headachs and take some easy steps before approaching your printer. Knowing the process of the printing method you choose will also help you design for your print method.

I hope you all have a great Thanksgiving holiday break! I sure did! :D
 

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wow this thread is helpfull. Im just starting out and have lots of questions. More about the legal aspect of things. So i make a business name, but should one incorporate the business or just make it an LLC? I want to stay away from being a sole proprietorship, but im going to be the only one working on this for a while. I may be selling them to retailers or just directly to customers via the internet.

So wat is the best for a small one person company, i am planing on owning all my equipment, and putting my own money into it. Doing the designing myself, the printing, and the marketing. A big job? is it to much to jump into at first?

thanks, from the young entrepreneur
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Excellent post. Thank you!
Thanks guys, I'm glad the thread is helpful.

If you have any questions about starting a clothing line you would like to ask, go ahead and post it in this thread.
 

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the information that is posted on here is priceless.... i just had my first store look for a wholesale list, and not knowing what to do, i just cut my retail numbers in half... this post confirmed that I was pretty right on... I gotta take some more time to re read everything on here... but thanks a million!!!
 

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Hi dlt,
I am not sure if you got any info on the business questions that you had but I may can offer some advice. First, let me introduce myself. Everyone calls me Nicole and I am starting a new brand called flirTee girl. Hey, it's a girl's nature to be flirty. I have a BS in accounting and an MBA in Business Admin. So, I am coming from the other side where I don't have any design experience but I am creative and anything I don't know I can figure it out.

The legal entity of your business depends on how much you risk you want to take and how you want to file taxes...that's what it basically boils down to. Your state's Secretary of State or whatever department that registers business should have a breakdown of all the legal entities. Since you asked about sole proprietorship, LLC, and Inc...I will briefly discuss those.

Sole Proprietorship: you assume all of the risk; do not need to file for status with state; file taxes as you normally would but use Schedule C
LLC: risk is limited to investment; must file with state for status; filing taxes depends on if you are single member LLC (can file with personal taxes using Schedule C or can file separately, or multi-member LLC (must file with partnership form)
Inc: risk limited to investment; must file with state for status; must file separately from personal taxes but it also gets complicated with different forms of corporations

I am an LLC because it fits my business and needs better.

If you need any other help on the business end, let me know. I am sure I will be asking lots of questions on the design end.
 
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