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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My clothing company is called Urban Rook Clothing and i'm about to release a t-shirt inspired by a hit tv show, but also wondering if i'm breaking into some copyright issues! The shirt inspiration is based off of "the fresh prince of bel-air" but the Tshirt i'm planning on releasing is "the Urban Rook of bel-air" should I drop the bel-air part? or am I in the clear with this idea? you can view it at Urban Rook News please respond asap! Or view it below
 

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I watched that television series in the 90's and I'm a big fan of Will Smith but the expression Urban Rook still doesn't mean anything to me. I'm not American though which might explain that. I just hope it's not TOO personal - the buyer needs to identify with it or they won't buy it. Get the opinion of other Americans.
Is the image a bit high there? It technicaly looks right but feels wrong. It might be because it's tilted.
Nothing wrong with the actual graphic though.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
no the print is perfectly straight just the visual on the template i guess lol. That's what i'm getting at though... with the shirt being adjusted with a different font and wording will it still be considered copyright infringement?
 

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Parodies are legal
It's not exactly that simple. Parody is a defense to an action, not a legal and risk-free way to infringe on existing IP. When creating parody artwork, you can still be sued. Then you can use the parody defense in court and the judge will decide who wins.

Johnny Cupcakes is one of many examples of parody. So yes, it does happen and many brands thrive on creating and selling parody artwork. But there's more to it than just "parodies are legal."
 

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For one thing seeking legal advise from a forum is not always the best idea. You should be contacting an attorney! I viewed your website and you are already breaking laws by playing the theme song on your website for commercial use. Anytime you play copywritten music in a commercial setting you need to contact ASCAP or BMI to obtail a licensing agreement. Contact a lawyer and do it right! Just my opinion.
 

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FYI, I have contacted ASCAP in the past so I know for sure the information I am giving you is 100% correct. But here is a post from "Answers.com"

"Giving airtime to any music by a recording artist whether it be on the radio, a web stream, or even in a public place requires one to pay a royalty to the artist via a music licensing company that has been certified with that artist. This is another stream of revenue to the artists along with selling CDs and doing concerts. One can be prosecuted for not paying the proper royalties."
 
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