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After reading many posts i have come to the decision that vinyl would work best. screen printing is a long process , plasticol must be sent to make do to all the equipment and regular transfer sheets leave a box unless you want to cut each image out yourself. My question is what would be the equipmnet needed to do vinyl transfers?I would need a heat press, and a cutter but what else? is a plotter the same thing as a cutter? also when making an image like a logo with different colors how would you go about transfering that onto the shirt? I know that there are a couple a post on how to do this but i didn't quite understand what they meant by just overlapping one color on another.. wouldnt one sheet cover the other one or does the cutter cut out just the outline of the design?
 

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The cutter/plotter (same thing) cuts the outline of the design. You then use an exacto knife to peel away the excess. Then you just heat press the design onto your shirt. You can overlap colors if you ned to. They will bond together. Make sure you cut a mirror image of the design. There is a plastic backing on the vinyl. You only need vinyl cutter, heat press, and vinyl.
 

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If your designs have any sort of high detail in them or multiple colors I'd go with screenprinting. I have a friend who works with vinyl and he says its really a pain when you have a lot of detail. And it seems to me this process would be pretty slow if you ever did a high volume of shirts.
 

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I'd go with plastisol transfers. If you combine designs on one sheet, you're paying cents for each design.
 

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identityburn said:
If your designs have any sort of high detail in them or multiple colors I'd go with screenprinting. I have a friend who works with vinyl and he says its really a pain when you have a lot of detail. And it seems to me this process would be pretty slow if you ever did a high volume of shirts.
Not so. Infact once you get your plotter set for the material youre cutting, the weeding is easy. As far as design that are too detailed,

that image is of a sticker I did that measured only 2.8 inches at its widest point. You just need to have you plotter set to fully cut through the vinyl, but not through your backing material.
 
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