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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so after finding out about three weeks ago (maybe a month) what fiber fibrillation is, and taking the advice that i should get a temp gun, assuming the idea that maybe i am under curing my prints... So i get a temp gun, and find that i am just fine as far as temp goes. My flash heats up to 400 plus degrees... the shirts are reaching degrees near this... as well as the ink. Could there be an overcure affect causing fibrillation to occur as well?

i want to be certain that my prints are cured properly, so i want to make sure, does the temp need to only just reach 320 or so for a split second, or does it need to sit there for a good half minute or so...

i hope i can figure this out.

Any response it appreciated!
 

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so after finding out about three weeks ago (maybe a month) what fiber fibrillation is, and taking the advice that i should get a temp gun, assuming the idea that maybe i am under curing my prints... So i get a temp gun, and find that i am just fine as far as temp goes. My flash heats up to 400 plus degrees... the shirts are reaching degrees near this... as well as the ink. Could there be an overcure affect causing fibrillation to occur as well?

i want to be certain that my prints are cured properly, so i want to make sure, does the temp need to only just reach 320 or so for a split second, or does it need to sit there for a good half minute or so...

i hope i can figure this out.

Any response it appreciated!
If you're using plastisol, your ink needs to reach 325 or whatever your manufacturers recommendation temp is for only a second. However if you are using a temp gun, you are only reading the top layer of ink so your actual reading should be a little higher then 325.

It's really the layer of ink you deposit onto the shirt.

But what I don't understand is, nowadays everyone wants soft hand ink these days, but they don't want fibrillation......Those two things don't go hand in hand (I suppose it's different if it's printed with discharge or dye discharge inks). :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
yeah, i was contemplating using a clear under base to stop it, but i was also going to try out some water based inks and see how i like the results. I just want the colors to look clean and bright after a wash.

i swore i read something about over-curing that causes pre-mature fibrillation. I will test out some new techniques (curing a little shorter and using an underbase) and get back to everyone with the results...

if anyone wants to comment still, i could use the help!

Thanks
 

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Hey we fixed this along time ago, still use same methods today. ink needs to be above 80; as inportant are pallett temp 80+ for them;156 screen; slow stroke;a few strike offs; lots of squeegee pressure; if first stroke isnt smooth not much can be done ; we print lots of white on dark....jeff
 

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Hey we fixed this along time ago, still use same methods today. ink needs to be above 80; as inportant are pallett temp 80+ for them;156 screen; slow stroke;a few strike offs; lots of squeegee pressure; if first stroke isnt smooth not much can be done ; we print lots of white on dark....jeff
Are you talking about the ink temperature? You keep your ink at above 80F ?
 

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Hey, yea when we start having problems!
put the ink bucket on the dryer agitate it ;in bucket or screen; heat up pallettes with flasher; 156 screen (me thinks that coarser screens allow fibers to be pulled thru mesh when ink is thick and gooey) slow stroke & heavy pressure allows ink time to shear off realy tight screens would probably help to if first stroke isnt good and smooth youre done ...we typ strike 8 shirts then start printing....get spot temp gun...habor freight...jeff
 
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