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I was watching some youtube videos recently on designing and producing t-shirts by yourself. and i saw one where a person just had a simple stencil and the process seemed easy enough.

is there a tutorial on creating your own shirts? like what time of paint to use, how to do it, etc.

and im not looking for the normal paint, i already tried that and ruined a few shirts, what do the bigger companies use for something like that? screen print i think its called? something by hand and relatively easy to do.

my design is just letters and very easy to stencilize [new word]. im wondering the materials that are needed.

any tips, links, or tuts much appreciated.
 

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If you don't want to sound like a noob, say "ink", not "paint." Paint goes on a house. I have known some folks who have used cardboard stencils and spray paint to get some nice effects, but the paint mostly washes out. This is why we in the trade use ink - be it for screenprinting or direct garment printing. Shirts can also be decorated with cad cut materials, like vinyl, flock, etc. Probably the most inexpensive way to get going is with transfers - I know there are some out there that can be applied with an iron. Otherwise, you're going to have to get into some equipment, hard to tell from your post if this is your intention...

Dan
 

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I was watching some youtube videos recently on designing and producing t-shirts by yourself. and i saw one where a person just had a simple stencil and the process seemed easy enough.

is there a tutorial on creating your own shirts? like what time of paint to use, how to do it, etc.

and im not looking for the normal paint, i already tried that and ruined a few shirts, what do the bigger companies use for something like that? screen print i think its called? something by hand and relatively easy to do.

my design is just letters and very easy to stencilize [new word]. im wondering the materials that are needed.

any tips, links, or tuts much appreciated.
Daniel,

I have seen the videos that you mentioned on YouTube, for what they are, they are pretty good, for a professional type application, they are not.
I believe that you saw that stuff and got an interest in making a t-shirt or two, and if you stay interested, you may get more serious, so with that said...
(I may be wrong)

For a cheap-o way to go about all of this... (Although you don't say what "normal paint" is...)

If you go to Dharma and look around, they have just about anything that you would need to do what you want with pretty good results.
PAINTS
DYES

You can make some stamps too if you are needing that, this stuff is pretty good, it's not what I'd call professional, but for a few shirts, it can give you some fun times.
Moldable Foam Stamps

Also, acrylic house paint can give some fairly good results too, used in moderation you can do some neat stuff, painted too thick and it can scratch the skin off of you! heh
Thinned down it works similar to a cheap acrylic (craft) paint, you can buy it in small amounts, or large, all depending on how you end up liking it.
Used with stamps, (or a mask) this is a good way to see how well you might like making t-shirts for friends/family, etc.
This does not wash out easy either, if done right, spray paint doesn't permeate the material, that's why it doesn't last, and it's (usually) not made to be washed either.
Exterior acrylic latex paints are made for weather, so washing is similar, so it's a better cheap choice.

As you probably already know, you can make cheap-o stencils with paper, light cardboard, acetate, and the most popular one, shelf paper that is sticky on one side.
Cut your stencil, make sure it's flat, (spray glue) and sponge paint on, spray on, brush on the inks or paints they sell at Dharma's, you will get results.
The longevity of it remains to be seen, but like I said, "for what it is...".

Airbrushing will give better results, it not only looks good, but it'll last longer too, the paint gets pushed into the fabric more, so it'll stay there.
It does help to heat-set it, best with a real heating press, but it can be done with an iron if you have to.

I have only played around experimenting with this stuff, I haven't made many, but it can work, and I saw some pretty good results on YouTube that they swore lasted a long time.
But...

Hopefully this is what you meant, if not, oops... :)

Randy
 
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