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Hi Everyone,

I don't understand something.
I've uploaded my 100% cotton sublimated images on this thread to prove sublimating on 100% cotton works. There's no doubt that the sublimation ink is IN the area of the fabric that was pretreated.

Am I just getting ignored here?

AGAIN, the image I'm uploading is sublimated image onto 100% cotton.
AND AGAIN, the image does not wash off!
The yellow post-its marks how many times I've washed the fabric with detergent in HOT water.

AND YES, black shirt is also 100% cotton~
 

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like i asked before,
if a viable/tested sublimation on cotton/dark comes to light will they admit it is possible?

it seems some have their minds made-up long ago and can't imagine that technology/innovation occurs

There is a principle which is a bar against all information,
which is a proof against all arguments, and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance -
that principle is contempt prior to investigation.
William Paley
 

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The plain fact is, you cannot sublimate cotton fibres. They don't open up the way polyester does to accept the gases from the sublimation process.

That's a FACT.

The best you can do is treat the SURFACE of the cotton fibres with some kind of solution that DOES accept sublimation, but this is sublimation ON cotton, not IN cotton.

So the title of this thread is correct in that it asks for sublimation ON cotton, but that isn't the sublimation process generally referred to when using polyester or polymer products.

For instance, you can sublimate ON aluminium sheet, by coating it with a sublimatable layer, but you cannot sublimate IN the aluminium itself.
 

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The plain fact is, you cannot sublimate cotton fibres. They don't open up the way polyester does to accept the gases from the sublimation process.

That's a FACT.

The best you can do is treat the SURFACE of the cotton fibres with some kind of solution that DOES accept sublimation, but this is sublimation ON cotton, not IN cotton.

So the title of this thread is correct in that it asks for sublimation ON cotton, but that isn't the sublimation process generally referred to when using polyester or polymer products.

For instance, you can sublimate ON aluminium sheet, by coating it with a sublimatable layer, but you cannot sublimate IN the aluminium itself.
IC.
I totally see your point.
Yes, cotton fibers do not accept dye sublimation ink since the gaseous process doe not occur on the cotton fiber itself.

So you are absolutely correct.
One can not sublimate on natural fibers!
 

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Sorry to keep banging on, but look at it from this angle -

Cotton t-shirts are WAY more desirable than polyester so, if sublimation on cotton is possible, why isn't the market flooded with dyesubbed cotton shirts?
 

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I and the US Patent office are two of the clowns mentioned in these posts.
I have a US Patent issued to me in May 27,2014 for sublimating onto cotton with my White toner.
I take issue to being called a snake oil sales person.
It took many years to develop my process as well as being the first one to develop the WHITE toner back in 2007 to be used with the Oki data printers for transferring onto textiles and many other substrates,
AL [email protected]
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think of it this way;
you can't sublimate on tile, keychains, metal, or any of the other 'sublimatable' items for sale without an additional application/coating

so why, oh why, are we treating the substrate of fabric as different?

do any of you ever, ever complain in the myriad of posts here in the sublimation sub-forum,
when people say 'what are the settings for sublimating on ceramic coffee mugs?'?

there is zero difference, except in your minds
it is 'sublimation on cotton', exactly the same as 'sublimation on wonderboard'

please explain how coating one substrate differs from coating another substrate to the extent that it requires a separate nomenclature/mindset?

apologies for mocking other members forthcoming in...........
 

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think of it this way;
you can't sublimate on tile, keychains, metal, or any of the other 'sublimatable' items for sale without an additional application/coating

so why, oh why, are we treating the substrate of fabric as different?

do any of you ever, ever complain in the myriad of posts here in the sublimation sub-forum,
when people say 'what are the settings for sublimating on ceramic coffee mugs?'?

there is zero difference, except in your minds
it is 'sublimation on cotton', exactly the same as 'sublimation on wonderboard'

please explain how coating one substrate differs from coating another substrate to the extent that it requires a separate nomenclature/mindset?

apologies for mocking other members forthcoming in...........
Thank you ED!!
I've been rolling the same explanation in my head but just got too tired to post. Seems petty and inconsiderate for all of us to be mocking the cotton sublimation inventors who dedicated their endless time and effort to make it work.

It's like mocking the inventor of penicillin.

For those of you who's still searching for cotton sublimation solution, please know the following:
The inventor I work with is US based.
He worked hard to be where he is today.
His cotton sublimation solution is recognized by other inventors in the same field. He deserves to be recognized.

I've been in Korea showing his samples to Korean and Chinese global companies and they are completely moved by his achievement. They tell me that they have not seen anything that comes close to his quality.
 

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I and the US Patent office are two of the clowns mentioned in these posts.
I have a US Patent issued to me in May 27,2014 for sublimating onto cotton with my White toner.
I take issue to being called a snake oil sales person.
It took many years to develop my process as well as being the first one to develop the WHITE toner back in 2007 to be used with the Oki data printers for transferring onto textiles and many other substrates,
AL [email protected]
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This forum is visited by a lot of noobies and this topic keeps coming up over and over again yet to this day, patents or no patents, there has never been a viable cost effective solution. For new peoples sake simply state the fact that you are no printing on cotton fabric you are printing on coating on cotton fabric.
 

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Sorry to keep banging on, but look at it from this angle -

Cotton t-shirts are WAY more desirable than polyester so, if sublimation on cotton is possible, why isn't the market flooded with dyesubbed cotton shirts?
Not sure what your market is but I could you could not find very many active wear/sports wear made of cotton - period. It is your beloved cotton that is the dinosaur unless your looking for a cheap shirt.
 

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think of it this way;
you can't sublimate on tile, keychains, metal, or any of the other 'sublimatable' items for sale without an additional application/coating

so why, oh why, are we treating the substrate of fabric as different?

do any of you ever, ever complain in the myriad of posts here in the sublimation sub-forum,
when people say 'what are the settings for sublimating on ceramic coffee mugs?'?

there is zero difference, except in your minds
it is 'sublimation on cotton', exactly the same as 'sublimation on wonderboard'

please explain how coating one substrate differs from coating another substrate to the extent that it requires a separate nomenclature/mindset?

apologies for mocking other members forthcoming in...........
You can directly sublimate a poly shirt. Sublimating an image to a cotton shirt requires adding a suitable plastic coating to the shirt.

If that does not add hand, great--but it surely has to add some. If the plastic adheres as well to the cotton as sub dye does to polyester ... well, no, that is impossible, but if it adheres as well as a high quality transfer, like JPSS, then that is great. Short of all that it is not ready for prime time, but may well be a great choice for various market niches.

But the main complaint is just that it is misleading language, since we are talking T-shirts, and a poly T-shirt directly accepts sub dyes into the fibers, no coating of any sort at all to come off or fail. That will never be the case for a cotton shirt. So there will be some hand, some capacity of the coating to wear over time.

Yes, I get that everything else requires a coating to accept dye sub, but since poly shirts do not, people expect cotton sub to be a unicorn, not just another way to pigment a transfer of plastic onto a shirt.
 

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You can directly sublimate a poly shirt. Sublimating an image to a cotton shirt requires adding a suitable plastic coating to the shirt.

If that does not add hand, great--but it surely has to add some. If the plastic adheres as well to the cotton as sub dye does to polyester ... well, no, that is impossible, but if it adheres as well as a high quality transfer, like JPSS, then that is great. Short of all that it is not ready for prime time, but may well be a great choice for various market niches.

But the main complaint is just that it is misleading language, since we are talking T-shirts, and a poly T-shirt directly accepts sub dyes into the fibers, no coating of any sort at all to come off or fail. That will never be the case for a cotton shirt. So there will be some hand, some capacity of the coating to wear over time.

Yes, I get that everything else requires a coating to accept dye sub, but since poly shirts do not, people expect cotton sub to be a unicorn, not just another way to pigment a transfer of plastic onto a shirt.
i agree with your assessment about testing, testing and testing

if all continues on its current trajectory and this new process reveals itself to be commercially viable:
- should questions/tests/etc be posted in the sublimation sub-forum?
- should there be a sub-forum for this particular process within the sublimation sub-forum?
- what do we call this new process so people know that you need to have a dye-sub setup already, or purchase one?

thanks NoXid (and/or anyone else who chooses to answer)

my answers right now would be to have a sub-forum in the dyesub sub-forum,
and to call it 'dyesub/sublimation FOR cotton & dark fabric'


on a side-note, i will say @hopestudio has been a pleasure to deal with
she is very honest and i would not hesitate to recommend her if you have questions/concerns
if the above questions are answered with any sort of consensus/flow,
i bet she will gladly adopt the system and post in that vein
 

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Thank you Edward.
I agree that there should be a sub-forum
so that going forward, people who gain knowledge and experience working
with dye sub printing on natural fabrics can share ideas,
questions, and support each other without the tirade against this new technique.

If you've been going to the printing trade shows this year,
you should have noticed CottonPromo's booth.
 

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This technology has been around for over 5 yers and now we are going to test as a forum?
How about testing sublimation toner versus sublimation ink versus offset press sublimation or silk screening sublimation.
How about onto wood and leather,
How about Unisub materials.
How about Mugs with ink jet sublimation versus laser toner sublimation. Which has the best resolution?
Which has the best wash fastness in the dishwasher?
Which coating is best?

This is one major can of worms so go knock your brains out criticizing all of these substrates and technologies with sublimation.
AL
 
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