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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been into Embroidery for three years and I Know when to ask for help. I got a job that the customer was not happy with the frist company, and I thought if I get the job done by a digitizing pro I would really look good and get the job. The pro has reworked the design three times and it still looks horrible. Is this why I need to learn digitizing:confused:. Or is there some companys out there that really can make the artwork look good?
 

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is it possible that the design is not well suited for embroidery or that the expectations of the finished design are too high (or aren't clear)?

I've seen good digitizers do some amazing work, but even the most amazing work is constrained by the limits of the print medium.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The original back had the nomal amount of trims. The new reworked design was to say the least a birds nest. Plus the machine would sew on the left side then jump to the bottom then go back to the left side and finish the segment. This went on through the whole sew out. If I to pick one shirt I would have picked the original over mine.:(
 

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It sounds to me like a problem with the digitizing. I have had designs digitized for me and have been very happy. classicalgraphics.net is a company I have used a few times and have been very happy with. You don't pay until you have done a test sew out so if you are not happy they will fix it, but I have never had to have the designs fixed.

Just like anything else, there are good digitizers and not so good ones. Fine one you are happy with, and stick with them.:)
 

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I'm afraid you're going to have to send it to another digitizer. I use EmbroideryDesigns.com, and have been very pleased.

Do an internet search -- you'll probably be able to find at least a few that will give you your first design free. That's a great way to see the quality of work a digitizer puts out, without an investment.

Having said that, there are designs that just do not translate well to embroidery. It can be extremely difficult to get the customer to hear that sometimes. Just as it can be extremely difficult for a customer to understand that very small lettering only works well with a plain font.

I had a design once that I knew would look perfectly awful embroidered, but the customer insisted. I had it digitized, ran a test, and showed it to the customer, and they said "go ahead...we like it".

I thought it looked so bad that I was hoping they would not tell people where they had it done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks All for the feed back. Matt I will lookup classicalgraphics and give them a try. And I will give google another try, and maybe give someone else a try as well. I feel like I'am doing interveiws for job apts. again, and that is one thing I don't like doing. It is hard on the nerves.
 

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Hi Mike,
I agree with Homestead Emb, from what you said about the machine going from the left side first, then jumping to the bottom and then back to the left, this does seem like an embroidery problem.
Here is what you can try: have your digitizer move the starting point to the middle, and move from the middle out, that should minimize the "buckling", if any. And yes, there are some designs out there that just will NOT come out good with embroidery, thats just how it goes. And if your client STILL insists on keeping that logo design, I would say try doing a patch.

If you would like, I can take a look at the artwork you have and offer you some suggestions.

-David
 
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