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I am looking to purchase a copy of Coreldraw X3 and I have noticed that there is a student/teacher version available which is significantly cheaper than the standard X3 (about $500AU). I'm wondering if anyone knows if the student version is any different to the standard version eg does it come with less features, or is it the same version only offered at a lower price? Yes I am a poor potato eating student
 

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David, the student version should have all of the same functionality as the retail version. The thing is it's supposed to be for non-commercial use, thats why it's so cheap. But who's going to find out right? ;)
 

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David,

Personally I wouldn't get the student version.

It is the same exact thing as the full retail version, except that you do not get the clip art collection, font collection, some of the manuals, and maybe a few other extras. The core program is the same.

The biggest thing is that you also do not get tech support and you do not qualify for future upgrades. That means if you want X4 later you will have to pay the full price again.

If you look around, you can get X3 Full Retail version for about $200, but you have to be careful and read all the fine print of the ads. Most of the people selling the student version try to do their best to make you think you are buying the full retail version.
 

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And I haven't heard of the student iPod skipping every fourth track, or the academic Word not having spellcheck.

Can't say I'm particularly impressed with that business move. Maybe it's the eternal student in me...
 

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Fluid said:
Dont be that cheap the program not that expensive
Incidentally, it's not a matter of being cheap. The price difference between student and retail versions of a product is often hundreds of dollars. When it's the same product you'd be stupid to pay more if you don't have to, and when it's slightly different (as in this case) it's definitely well worth considering "Is it worth paying $X for those extra features?"
 

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All academic versions (that I have seen) expressly prohibit commercial use - so it's not an issue of being cheap or saving hundreds for the same program - it's an issue of protecting your business and your reputation. If you don't care about licensed software you can get tons of bootleg stuff that is "the same product" but it isn't right regardless of who may or may not find out.

Steve
 

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camconcay said:
All academic versions (that I have seen) expressly prohibit commercial use
Yeah, that does make a lot of sense - I'd always wondered why academic versions would even exist. Interestingly though I've never heard this before/been warned, etc. (I'm sure it's true because it makes a lot of sense - my point is it's not as widely known as it should be).
 

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camconcay said:
All academic versions (that I have seen) expressly prohibit commercial use -

Directly from the Adobe FAQ:

Question

"I'm very interested in buying the Education version of Adobe Creative Suite, but
first I want to know if the software can be used to produce work for
paying customers once I am working in the industry, or do I have to buy
a different version of Creative Suite once I'm working in the industry?”


Answer


Good news! You can use Adobe Education software (any title!) to produce
commercial/professional paid-for work when you leave school, or even
while you are in school. In this regard, Adobe does not limit how
student software is used. So students can use it to learn and to make
money!



Another reason to go Adobe :)
 

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Excellent.

I guess the reason for academic versions is the same reason as free care baskets for college room dorms (i.e. give them a free/cheap sample early because people are more likely to go with the product they already know than to buy something new when it comes time to upgrade).
 

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Solmu said:
I guess the reason for academic versions is the same reason as free care baskets for college room dorms (i.e. give them a free/cheap sample early because people are more likely to go with the product they already know than to buy something new when it comes time to upgrade).
Exactly. It's not because they care about poor impoverished students, it's because those students have 50 years of software buying ahead of them, and people become hibituated.
 

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Thank you for the update - I had some academic versions of Macromedia's suite and it (at that time) prohibitied commercial use - as did Microsoft's products. So if you qualify for academic versions (at least adobe's) it looks like the way to go!
 

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Solmu said:
Incidentally, it's not a matter of being cheap. The price difference between student and retail versions of a product is often hundreds of dollars. When it's the same product you'd be stupid to pay more if you don't have to, and when it's slightly different (as in this case) it's definitely well worth considering "Is it worth paying $X for those extra features?"
True. Its just the cost of Corel is pretty darn cheap to begin with.
 

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Keep in mind also that the full Retail version that you can buy and download from the Corel website does not include everything that the boxed version does.
 

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Keep in mind also that the full Retail version that you can buy and download from the Corel website does not include everything that the boxed version does.
Really? I bought mine from the corel website as a download. I'm missing good stuff?
 

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Yes, I think you are missing some good stuff.
Here is what is not included in the download version according to the Corel website.


"Download Version Information

Please note: Download versions do not include CD, printed manuals, clipart/photo images or fonts or lynda.com tutorials

More than 10,000 individually selected clipart and digital images
1,000 OpenType fonts, plus 35 Windows® Glyph List 4 (WGL4) fonts
NEW! 100 creative templates included free of charge
Bitstream Font Navigator "

There are actually 4 Cd's in the retail box.

Disk 1 has all the program files, including Rawshooter which is a program for working with the RAW digital camera file type.

Disk 2 has the clip art as well as frames, patterns, spraylists and tiles.

Disk 3 has all the fonts, high res photos and photo objects.

Disk 4 has the Corel Draw Design Collection and the lynda.com training videos.

Plus there is the 430 page User Guide, the 364 page color clip art, font and photo object index manual, and the 78 page color hand book called Insights from the Experts, which has several step by step how-to's for creating different projects.
 

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Dangit...I could sure use that rawshooter program, since my digicam shoots raw files. The lynda.com training tutorials would have been nice too!

I guess that's what I get for wanting the instant gratification of the download instead of waiting for the CDs to ship.
 

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I know some software manufacturers will still send you what you would have gotten if you had it shipped, or bought the boxed version from a local retailer.

You may want to check and see if you can still get those things, Rodney.
 
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