T-Shirt Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,478 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have been doing some wash tests with large 12x12 full color stock transfers (plastisol} on blk shirts. The problem I am seeing is little air bubbles, dimples etc. I dont know if this is normal from the shirt shrinking a bit or a mistake in my transfering to the blank. If anyone has info please give me your ideas and or remedys. This particular transfer doesnt have any open areas and a lot of white ink. The white areas stand out the most with the puckering. I wonder if I can re-press this shirt with craft paper on top and solve the dilema?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,029 Posts
I wonder if I can re-press this shirt with craft paper on top and solve the dilema?
Thats exactly what I was going to suggest before I read the last line of your post. I think that that would solve the problem.

The other thing you might try is playing around with raising the time/temp/pressure. It seems that the ink is not completely melting into the shirt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,478 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Ok...I repressed the design but was out of craft paper. I used the backing paper from of my sign vinyl. Coated on one side similar to transfer paper. Makes the designs shiny which is exactly what I dont want but we will run em through the wash and see if the pucker problem is solved
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
Make sure your garment is DRY. Prepress 10 seconds, lift, let steam escape, press another 10-plus seconds.

Yes, check time/pressure/temp. Cut up your transfer and test on similar goof shirts.

I'm going 25 seconds on plastisol, medium heavy pressure, 375 F. I warm/hot peel my opaque white after rolling with Speedball brayer (because image is delicate/small). It was reading through archives here that someone mentioned using a rolling pin. Well, I had the brayer and actually like the ergonomics better.

For black plastisol, I must peel warm/cold or the text ends up "smeary". I also run the Speedball brayer a few times only because I've got some delicate images (thin lines).

AND, try flipping shirt onto a teflon sheet or Reynold's Baking Parchment Paper (one of my readily available inexpensive heat pressing tools) and repress for half the time on the backside.

The Reynold's paper is about $2.99 and you can re-use it until brittle or you think it's been soiled with ink.

I was having problem with t-shirt pilling on some 2XLs. It was NOT LINT, nor time/pressure/temp. A seasoned pro advised me to flip the shirt...wow, it worked great on my TransJetII/Magic Jet II transfer. Made the image look so much better that I started doing this with big full page transfers.:D

Susan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,478 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Wash test was successfull! These are hot split transfers with a dwell time in the press of about 10 seconds at 385 degrees. The rolling pin idea isnt gonna work with hot split...I think more a pressure, time dilema than anything. I do hate repressing the transfer because it loses the flat appearance of plastisol or screenprinting. The same thing happens with heatpress vinyl when you cover sheet and press again. The design loses the flat look and gets semi glossy. I have a teflon pad protector on my press.....If I turn the blank and press again for another dwell time will it be ok????
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
MotoskinGraphix said:
Wash test was successfull! These are hot split transfers with a dwell time in the press of about 10 seconds at 385 degrees. The rolling pin idea isnt gonna work with hot split...I think more a pressure, time dilema than anything. I do hate repressing the transfer because it loses the flat appearance of plastisol or screenprinting. The same thing happens with heatpress vinyl when you cover sheet and press again. The design loses the flat look and gets semi glossy. I have a teflon pad protector on my press.....If I turn the blank and press again for another dwell time will it be ok????
You'll get that unwanted glossiness when you flip the shirt with plastisol. There is the possibility that the white ink was no good? Maybe transfer was affected by humidity? You can do a search at screenprinters.net on white inks. Apparently can be problematic. I'm not a screenprinter.

Well, if you cut up the transfer you can test for more time, heavier pressure and even the "rolling" pin on some goof shirts.

Thanks for headsup on repressing vinyl...haven't cut any yet. Good luck.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
suzieh said:
I'm going 25 seconds on plastisol, medium heavy pressure, 375 F. Susan
Susan, I think the plastisol inks for the transfers you are using are from the 90's type or older. Today's high quality plastisol inks and transfer manufacturing know-hows... press time is 4-6 sec. hot peel, perfect every press...... serious. :)

What brand of transfers are you using ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
They are custom opaque cold peel from dowlinggraphics.com (my own design).

I did get some sample Dowling stock transfers...they appear thinner ink-wise.

All I know is using suggested settings did not work. So after testing I got great results. True black and white opaque. Great curing/adhesion. Have held up to washing and drying tests...at about 20-plus by now.

I've seen the stock transfers in downtown LA being heatpressed with air-operated Insta. Seemed like it was a quick press:).

Scrap-Boy said:
Susan, I think the plastisol inks for the transfers you are using are from the 90's type or older. Today's high quality plastisol inks and transfer manufacturing know-hows... press time is 4-6 sec. hot peel, perfect every press...... serious. :)

What brand of transfers are you using ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
suzieh said:
They are custom opaque cold peel from dowlinggraphics.com (my own design).

I did get some sample Dowling stock transfers...they appear thinner ink-wise.

All I know is using suggested settings did not work. So after testing I got great results. True black and white opaque. Great curing/adhesion. Have held up to washing and drying tests...at about 20-plus by now.

I've seen the stock transfers in downtown LA being heatpressed with air-operated Insta. Seemed like it was a quick press:).
thanks for the details suzieh,

now i'm really :confused: :confused: :confused: .....

serious.... using a basic manual heat press, with custom/stock transfers around here, it only takes 4-6 seconds press time to apply, at about 375F, Hot peel (you may need to make very fine minor adjustments).

You choose from regular opaque or high opaque finish for any color, they print on all fabric colors, look great and last forever type thing.

Can't figure out why all transfers of this type are NOT like this today. ???? Quick and Easy to apply , high quality.... (lots of quality testy-testy).

The inks used are available and come from some fellow Canadians, but they also have USA offices and in Europe to ...i think. So it's not Only a Canadian "Miracle Type Transfer inks".....:D

Does anyone here use this TYPE iron-on transfers i'm bragging about ????:) ... i feel so alone. I can not be the only Joe in the " Iron-On Universe " that uses these amaizing transfers........or am I ?
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top