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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello.

Excuse me if there are some other threads regarding this topic, this is my first post ever.

Anyways, I am looking to make some shirts using a stencil design. However, I am not looking to screen print because I don't want that heavy shiny look. I am looking for a really flat one tone look that blonds with the t-shirt, such as a spray painted look. I just want it to be fairly opaque and not fade too much in the wash, but also look like it is of good quality for what it is. I will only be using black paint. What do you believe is my best choice? Airbrushing, spray painting, fabric painting, acrylics, etc... I am looking to spend as little as possible as I am a beginner and don't have any equipment. Any additional advice would also be appreciated.

Thanks.
 

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Airbrush would work best in my opinion, because you can buy specific paint for apparel. Spray paint can(but not always) get sticky, heavy and messy on shirts.

Of course if cost is the issue, go get some cheap cans of black spray from your local hardware store and spray away!
 

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As far as opacity, there are some pretty nice opaque paints for $3-$5 a bottle.

As far as cost, it depends on what you consider "cheaply".

If you want to do it super cheap...get a straw, load it with paint and blow through it(sarcasm).

For a cheaper set up, here is a google search for cheap arbrushes. You'll need an air source(can or compressor).

Google
 

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Have you done airbrushing before? If you plan on doing one of a kind shirts this would be the way to go. However I would suggest getting yourself a small compressor to use with the airbrush, canned air can get expensive in a hurry if you are doing a lot of work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have a standard/basic air compressor that is mostly used to inflate tires, would that work?

I've never done airbrushing before no. I am looking to do a lot of shirts with the same design so the results need to be somewhat uniform. What are my best options as far as a reusable stencil go?

also

Specifically what paint would be best?

Is there something I can use to hold the stencil to the shirt like an adhesive?

Is there any type of after spray to help retain the color?

Does it matter what material the shirt is made out of?

and do I need to heat set it?

Thanks.
 

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I have a standard/basic air compressor that is mostly used to inflate tires, would that work?

I've never done airbrushing before no. I am looking to do a lot of shirts with the same design so the results need to be somewhat uniform. What are my best options as far as a reusable stencil go?

also

Specifically what paint would be best?

Is there something I can use to hold the stencil to the shirt like an adhesive?

Is there any type of after spray to help retain the color?

Does it matter what material the shirt is made out of?

and do I need to heat set it?

Thanks.
Ok, how do you plan on making the stencils?
To use an airbrush you will need a regulator to control the air pressure. You could look at some of the hobby brushes available.
However before you go that far you need to determine how the stencil will be created?
How many designs you will offer?
What your budget is for this endeavor?

There are a lot of different ways you could go and it will depend on the answers to a lot of questions. It could be that ordering transfers and getting an inexpensive heat press might be an option. Depending on your budget, adding a cutter if you have a computer might be an option. All depends on the designs you have in mind and the amount of money you want to spend.
CW
 

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You might want to do a search on Videos on Airbrushing on shirts and see if that is something that looks like what you are looking to do.
here is one link

[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZRHzHkCNUI[/media]

I wonder if you are thinking more on the lines of screenprinting...you might want to google that as well.
 

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I've been a working airbrush artist for over 30 yrs. on various surfaces from illustration work, bookcovers, murals on motorcycles, leather and yes, lots of clothing.
I'd suggest if you want to get into airbrushing, well, there's a lot to it.
compressor, regulator and moisture separator, proper paint for the substrate and yes, you will have to fully heat set the paint(typically, it's 320-340 degrees for X number of minutes).
I'd suggest Wicked Paints/Createx.
For an airbrush, there's single action as well as double action. Single action only allows you to control the paint flow, not the air. With double action airbrushes (I use only Iwata), you control both the airflow as well as paint flow.
You should watch some videos on youtube. Good airbrush artists make it look easy.
Stay away from the cheap crappy airbrushes. They are just junk. Check Craigslist.
They are a picky beast that requires you to keep your needles very straight and sharp pointed.
They can/do clog often and easily, also lots of tip build up, especially with paint used for clothing.
With what it sounds like you want to do, I'd suggest that you buy a couple of screens, emulsion and do your artwork on a clear water receptive acetate (find in art suppy store) with an opaque marker, expose it in the sunshine (after the emulsion has fully dried, at least overnight), and use some waterbased screenprinting ink with a squeegie.
You'll get much better results.
Airbrushes take a lot of practice and dedication.
 
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