T-Shirt Forums banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What programs are best for designing the graphics? I assume Photoshop is one, but a company I'm interested in using for the transfer states they do not accept Photoshop files.

Another question is on formatting the design once it's finished; what format does the graphic design have to be in?

I'm basically trying to ask the Do's and Don'ts and rules when designing graphics on the computer. Currently, I am thinking about getting involved in the T-shirt business but I'd like to know a bit of the ropes and some general information before I do.

Please, share your answers. Thanks. :]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,497 Posts
What programs are best for designing the graphics? I assume Photoshop is one, but a company I'm interested in using for the transfer states they do not accept Photoshop files.

Another question is on formatting the design once it's finished; what format does the graphic design have to be in?

I'm basically trying to ask the Do's and Don'ts and rules when designing graphics on the computer. Currently, I am thinking about getting involved in the T-shirt business but I'd like to know a bit of the ropes and some general information before I do.

Please, share your answers. Thanks. :]
:welcome: another program would be Adobe Illustrator, as far as file format a .eps should be what they are looking for, it's alway a good idea to ask them what format they want, I would assume they want a vector image so scaling the graphic isn't a issue.

Lots of threads here on TSF relating to your do's and don't just search and read.

Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
675 Posts
We use Illustrator & Corel. Outputting is best done in .eps format, which can be opened up by both Illustrator & Corel. The more experienced artists seem to use Photoshop, but it just depends on which type of art you plan to produce. There seems to be available quite a number of training materials for Corel as it relates to screen print art, so if just starting out, that may be your best program to begin with, and then jump to Illustrator or Photoshop as you gain experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,455 Posts
Here is a very good book about software and prepping art for t-shirt screen printing. A majority of the info will also be good for any of the printing methods. The book is Dane Clement's T-Shirt Artwork Simplified. It comes in two versions, one for Adobe software and one for Corel software. Here is the link on Amazon -

Amazon.com: t-shirt artwork simplified

One thing to note: if a contract printer for transfer or any type of screen printing can't deal with Photoshop files, they are limiting you unnecessarily. Raster artwork (Photoshop type) is perfectly fine for use in large format printing as long as a few parameters and requirements are met. 90% of my art is done in Photoshop and it is not a problem getting it printed large format. I do artwork for full wall displays in Photoshop that is printed on super large printing equipment.

I think some printers don't want to deal with raster artwork because too many people submit artwork that is not created properly for large printing sizes, and/or their art departments are not top notch. My point is that you should not shy away from raster programs like Photoshop if that is the better choice for a particular style of artwork. Raster and Vector programs each have their strong points, and in my case, a raster program is much better suited for the type of art my company's reputation is built on (digitally painted art).
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top