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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have a good rule of thumb in the case of sizing. To keep down my ordering of 8 millions sizes and colors I have shrunk my stuff down to 3 colors one for each line and 3 sizes in each shirt. Sm/Med/Lg What is a good precent of each. I am tending to think that my target market will be pretty evenly distributed but do you guys have thoughts?

h
 

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This has been discussed a few times before, so you might search for some of those. It varies widely by target audience.


If you're targeting a US audience, I really would suggest stocking XL as well. We sell a lot more XL than we do Small, though if your market is thin, young, fashion type stuff your customers would fit smaller sizes.

Large is our biggest seller, then medium, then XL.
 

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I agree with twinge; if you can only stock three sizes, then (depending on your target market) you are probably better off with M/L/XL than SML. The standard S/M/L/XL really would be preferable though.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I used the search but it didn't turn up anything. I did't know exactly how to phrase it. I am targeting the young fashion minded demographic. I am fairly positive that they mainly range s-l. I will ask my friend in the business too.
 

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IMHO the Fashion market is tending to lean toward more tighter fitting Tees,
but that again depends on your targeted market. If you were talking Hiphop then they would be looking for larger garments. It's all down to what your customers want to buy rather than what you want to sell. It's never easy.
 

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here is a good reason why it is better to make Custom Plastisol Transfers of your designs (when the art permits) and print as you sell. No need to stock printed shirts. :)
 

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T-BOT said:
here is a good reason why it is better to make Custom Plastisol Transfers of your designs (when the art permits) and print as you sell. No need to stock printed shirts. :)

Amen to that.
I offer 13 colour options, and 13 size options. From 2T - men's XL. (I will be adding XXL, X-small , small guy's to the site) Why limit what you can sell?

I've been down the road of ordering 100's of silkscreened shirts, have them sit there in a box, selling one at a time. In fact, I still have some.

If you're going the silkscreen route, I would offer these sizes: Women's - s,m,lg,XL Men's - m,lg,XL
 

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T-BOT said:
here is a good reason why it is better to make Custom Plastisol Transfers of your designs (when the art permits) and print as you sell. No need to stock printed shirts. :)
Aye, but you'll still need to stock BLANKS of the right sizes/colors if you want good shipping times.


The way I generally look at it is people will be more able and willing to fit in a shirt that's a little too big than one that's too small. This is more for a general market though - maybe those crazy youngins (that are, er, my age :p) would rather it be extremely tight instead.
 

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Twinge said:
Aye, but you'll still need to stock BLANKS of the right sizes/colors if you want good shipping times..

I use American Apparel shirts. The disributer I use give price breaks at a quantity of 6 (rather than 12) As people order, I order 6 or 12 shirts. That way, your first orders early on may take a few days longer, but you're slowly building an inventory without losing your shirt ! (Pun intended):rolleyes:
 

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howierocket said:
Does anyone have a good rule of thumb in the case of sizing. To keep down my ordering of 8 millions sizes and colors I have shrunk my stuff down to 3 colors one for each line and 3 sizes in each shirt. Sm/Med/Lg What is a good precent of each. I am tending to think that my target market will be pretty evenly distributed but do you guys have thoughts?
If you want to include XL, you could take out one of the colors and have two colors in four sizes.

Considering that most t-shirt designs don't come with a color choice at all, two choices are twice as many!
 

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here is a good reason why it is better to make Custom Plastisol Transfers of your designs (when the art permits) and print as you sell. No need to stock printed shirts.
Like Twinge said, you'll still have to stock the blank shirts if you want a fast turnaround time. Also, if you are using plastisol transfers, you would still have to press the shirts yourself and own a heat press. There are tradeoffs either way :)
 

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Rodney said:
Like Twinge said, you'll still have to stock the blank shirts if you want a fast turnaround time. Also, if you are using plastisol transfers, you would still have to press the shirts yourself and own a heat press. There are tradeoffs either way :)
hummm, turn around time Eh! you get the order today, pickup the shirts the next day, press it and ship it out. Cant get any faster THAN that. :rolleyes:

besides, after Twinge sells a million shirts I might start to listen to him a little harder. :p
 

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hummm, turn around time Eh! you get the order today, pickup the shirts the next day, press it and ship it out. Cant get any faster then that.
Picking up the shirts the next day isn't an option for all people. Buying heat press equipment and pressing shirts isn't desirable for everyone (and still an investment of time and money).

If you have the printed shirts in stock and get an order at 8:00am, you can have it it the mailman's hands by 12:00PM and depending on the customer's location, they could have it the next day.

Like I said, there are tradeoffs either way (both are viable ways of selling t-shirts), but the point of this thread is a breakdown of sizes :)

I've heard 1:2:2:1 as a ratio (S:M:L:XL), but again, depending on your market, you could need zero smalls and more XXL XXXL. It does get to be a learning process.
 

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Rodney said:
Buying heat press equipment and pressing shirts isn't desirable for everyone (and still an investment of time and money).
I think most would prefer to press/make the shirt them selfs. IT'S SO EAZY. It take less than a MINUTE and you get a PROFESSIONAL high quality shirt like your competitor brands have or better.

Investing in a heat press becomes a company asset and its a small price to pay for the GREAT selection you can offer your clients.

There is no better way for a start up that needs selection.
IF your designs dont sell, you are not out of thousands of dollars with PRE-PRINTED Shirts. :)
 

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I think most would prefer to press/make the shirt them selfs. IT'S SO EAZY. It take less than a MINUTE and you get a PROFESSIONAL high quality shirt like your competitor brands have or better.
I don't think it would be accurate to say "most". Some would, some wouldn't.

Without actual numbers, we can't say which is the most preferred.

Remember, what is "easy" and a "perfect option" for one person, is just as easy or perfect for the next person.

It takes time to learn how to use a heat press, it takes time to print garments on demand. Not all brands and new lines require a customer selection.

IF your designs dont sell, you are not out of thousands of dollars with PRE-PRINTE
It's not that easy and cut and dry though. Some brands will just prefer to start out with screen printed goods that they don't have to press. It doesn't always take thousands of dollars to get pre printed inventory. If your designs don't sell and you are heat pressing, you are still out the investment of a heat press, materials, plastisol transfers (which also have to be bought in advance), blanks shirts.

Everyone has their preferences. There's no need to make big generalizations about which is better. Each business situation is different.
 

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Rodney said:
It takes time to learn how to use a heat press, it takes time to print garments on demand.
learning to apply with a heat press is SO EASY when you use GOOD transfers.

Thank God the delema and bad rap that Heat Transfers have been given for years is NOW public knowledge. Heat Transfers are just as good or Better than Direct to shirt screen printing at a minimal investment for anyone new to the t-shirt biz (where the art permits).

Why have pre-printed shirts when you have no orders is a terrible mistake to make.

But like you said, it's not for everyone and according to them it's NOT a terrible mistake.

I can live with that. :)
 

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Thank God the delema and bad rap that Heat Transfers have been given for years is NOW public knowledge
That's definitely true. Although in the past, the heat transfers weren't as high quality as they are now. I think a lot of advancements have been made.

But for me personally, I definitely had a slight negative connotation about heat transfers before I started this forum. Even though I sold them through cafepress for years.

AFTER reading the posts from the transfer printers/users/sellers in this forum (and after seeing various printed samples at the Imprintables/Coastal Business booth at the Long Beach tradeshow), I became more educated and would definitely say it's a viable option for someone to consider when starting a t-shirt line.

Done correctly, the end results can look great. Done poorly, bad screen printing or bad heat transfers both look horrible.
 
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