T-Shirt Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,375 Posts
I have never done any DIY project and I'm not the craftiest person around.
You can buy a ready made, Epson p600 based one, from OpenDTG.
These print as good as any other DTG, and you don't need high resolution for t-shirts anyway.

You must be able to troubleshoot, and replace parts yourself, and there is no warranty. However, parts are readily available for relatively low price, in the form of complete P600 printers at the nearest computer shop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,375 Posts
The biggest bugaboo with DTG is the tendency for the white channels to plug. These machines need to be kept in use and cleaned frequently, which means burning through some expensive ink even when you have nothing to print. Else, you burn through even more expensive heads.
Very true for beginners, but as with everything the only way to learn is to try. The worst case scenario is $600 for a readily available P600 printer, which is basically a complete set service parts, including a brand new printhead ;).

Unused ink in the lines, can be "recycled" back in the ink container before flushing, so there is no much ink wasted.
I hope I'm not making it look too easy, because it isn't. If it was, everyone would do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,375 Posts
Ha... I started printing (screenprinting) as a hobby, just before starting my second year at the University, and I used all the money I had to buy the equipment. However, because of this, I was able to buy a nice house in cash, just one year after my graduation.
I have no doubt you could do the same, but lack of confidence is an issue I don't think people can overcome. I'm exactly the opposite... I believe there is nothing I cannot do, if I really want to do it.

Printing on its own will not make you money, and sales don't magically happen. You need to communicate, find out what people want, and make little partnerships. The campus is actually a really good environment to start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,375 Posts
#Tabob is the one who has done it (at least with a white screen print base and CMYK DTG on top ...
I thought I was for a while, but I'm not. Apparently, Kornit has been making high volume carousel attached printers since 2012, and Polyprint have been doing exactly what I do since 2015.
though I imagine he came to that creative solution after trying with CMYKW DTG).
Correct! I tried CMYKW DTG and I'm not a big fan of it, because I really hate the pretreatment part, and the problems that come with it. However, printing over white or clear screen printed underbase is fantastic.



Anyway... the university campus is a fantastic opportunity to get started. As for the DTG printer maintenance, the print-head must be used daily (2-3 prints at least I'd say), and kept flooded in flushing solution when not in use. Also the ink system should be flushed every week for peace of mind. If the printer is not to be used over the weekend, then don't refill with ink until Monday.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,375 Posts
Another option instead of going with DTG, is using a laser transfer printer. You can do the small quantities without worrying about the printer setting idle between uses. They are also capable of high resolution, full-color imprints. Just make sure to go with a model that prints using white (not all do) and I would recommend getting one that can print 11x17 paper so your imprint size isn't limited. With laser transfer, you also have the option of printing on hard materials, like mugs and such, as well has temporary tattoos and water-slide decals. All you need is a different kind of transfer paper for each application.
An A3 size OKI white toner printer will cost around $5,000, and that's pretty much the only option. Also laser transfers are much more expensive that DTG.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top