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Don't invest in your own DTG until you prove to yourself that you can sell enough shirts to make it worthwhile. Printful, or whatever POD, is a low risk way to try it and see.

Things you need in addition to a DTG:
- Pretreatment Unit
- Heat Press
- Blanks (easiest if you have a local supplier)
- Shipping scale, polybags, label printer, online postage account

The biggest bugaboo with DTG is the tendency for the white channels to plug. These machines need to be kept in use and cleaned frequently, which means burning through some expensive ink even when you have nothing to print. Else, you burn through even more expensive heads. Forget the initial cost of the printer, it is the operating costs and maintenance that you need to worry about--thus the admonition to prove your design and sales ability with POD first.

I'm sure you know, but everybody and their dog is already trying to sell T-shirts online. It was always competitive, but the rise of the POD people has made it insanely so.
 

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I'm actually not really worried about competition, I intend to sell in a small, niche market (my campus), with no direct competitors. What does worry me is the fact that I'm not sure I can sell many t-shirts, since there are not that many students on campus. Hence, I'm afraid I will not be able to put up enough prints as to make my printer work well. How many prints per week should I do as to avoid being plagued by ink clogs?
#Tabob is the one who has done it (at least with a white screen print base and CMYK DTG on top ... though I imagine he came to that creative solution after trying with CMYKW DTG). I started off with the intent of doing a DIY DTG, even bought an R1900 on closeout as a base. But after more research and consideration, I opted to screen print instead, as I didn't want the entire process to be dependent on computer hardware.
 
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